Enchiladas Rancheras

Enchiladas Rancheras

If you’ve been around me for a while, you know that I love Mexican food. It is hands down my greatest joy and my greatest weakness. We were in Colorado on vacation a few years ago, and we had Mexican food 9 out of 11 days! These enchiladas are an homage to my grandma, whose enchiladas were (next to her biscuits and gravy) my most favorite meal. 

Grandma’s enchiladas were pretty basic—ground beef, diced onion, and tomato sauce with cheese. They were simple but divine. These are a little bit more complex but equally delicious. These are a staple in our house and one of my daughter’s favorite foods! I like to dice a little extra sweet onion and use it as a garnish and avocado, sour cream, and salsa. I’m getting hungry just thinking about them. 

You can use a store-bought enchilada sauce if you’re in a hurry or don’t want to make it. But I have to warn you it will not be as good! I like to double it and then refrigerate the remainder. It’s good on tofu eggs, burritos, tacos, nachos, and of course, these enchiladas! I like the addition of the Impossible Meat because it reminds me of my Grandma’s recipe. You can easily skip it if you are avoiding plant-based meats. I would, however, add another can of beans. These enchiladas also freeze well. Just assemble them and then freeze. Enjoy! 

If you make them, please tag me on Instagram and let me know how you like them!


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Enchiladas Rancheras

  • Author: Stephanie Bosch
  • Prep Time: 20
  • Cook Time: 25
  • Total Time: 45 minutes
  • Yield: 1216 1x
  • Diet: Vegan

Scale

Ingredients

Enchilada Filling:

  • 1 medium sweet onion, diced
  • 1 medium jalapeño pepper, seeded and chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced 
  • 1 package plant-based meat (optional) **See note
  • 1 (15 oz) can black beans, drained and rinsed
  • 1 (4 oz) can diced tomatoes with green chilies
  • 1 teaspoon cumin
  • 1 teaspoon oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt & pepper, each
  • 16 corn tortillas, or 10 whole wheat tortillas 
  • Vegan Cheese Shredded *See Notes

Ranchero Sauce:

  • 3 tablespoons flour (I used brown rice flour for a GF sauce)
  • 16 oz vegetable broth
  • 1 (6oz) can tomato paste 
  • 3 Tbsp cilantro, finely chopped
  • 3 Tbsp chili powder
  • 1 Tbsp cumin 
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 tsp smoked paprika
  • 1 tsp oregano
  • 1 ½ tsp salt
  • ½ tsp black pepper
  • pinch of cinnamon
  • 1 lime juiced

Toppings:

  • Daiya Cheddar Cheese block, grated
  • Diced Avocado
  • Salsa
  • Vegan Sour Cream
  • Minced Cilantro

Instructions

Preheat oven to 350° F. 

Ranchero Sauce:

  1. In a small bowl, mix flour, chili powder, cumin, garlic powder, smoked paprika, oregano, salt & pepper, and cinnamon.
  2. In a medium saucepan over medium heat, bring 1/2 cup vegetable stock to a boil. Slowly, add dry spice and constantly whisk until the mixture is smooth and fragrant for about one minute. Add tomato paste and stir well until combined. Slowly add broth and whisk until smooth. Add lime juice and cilantro. Stir to combine. Remove from heat and set aside. 

Enchilada Filling:

  1. Warm a large skillet over medium heat. When warm, add onion and sauté until translucent—about 7 minutes. (If the onions begin to stick, add 2 tablespoons of water and stir).
  2. Add garlic and jalapeño and cook until fragrant, 1-2 minutes. 
  3. Add plant-based meat if using: Cook for about 5 minutes or until lightly browned. 
  4. Add black beans and stir well to incorporate. 
  5. Add canned tomatoes, spices, and add 1/2 cup of enchilada sauce. Stir well and cook for 2-3 minutes. Remove from heat. 

Assembly:

  1. Wrap tortillas in a wet cloth or paper towel. Put on a microwave-safe plate and warm in the microwave for one minute. Keep tortillas wrapped while assembling. 
  2. Add ranchero sauce to a pie pan or other deep bottomed plate. 
  3. Add one cup of ranchero sauce to the bottom of a 9 x 12 pan, coating the pan evenly. 
  4. Remove one tortilla and dip it in the ranchero sauce. Place tortilla in 9 x 12 pan.
  5. Add about 1/4-1/3 cup of filling (depending on your shells’ size, you may want to add more or less). 
  6. Add 2 tablespoons of Daiya cheese. 
  7. Carefully roll the tortilla and place seam side down. 
  8. Repeat with remaining tortillas if you run out of space using another pan. I fit 8 to a pan (6 side by side and then two end to end at the bottom of the pan). I used a smaller 8×8 pan to fit the rest. I covered them with wrap and froze them for later. 
  9. When you have finished assembling the enchiladas, pour the rest of the ranchero sauce over them and sprinkle with shredded cheese. 
  10. Cover with foil and bake for 25 minutes. 
  11. Carefully remove foil. Turn oven to broil and cook for 2 minutes or until cheese is bubbling. DO NOT WALK AWAY! 
  12. Remove from oven and serve with avocado, salsa, cilantro, and sour cream! 
  13. Enjoy! 

Notes

*I like Daiya block style cheddar and grate it myself.  I NEVER use pre-shredded vegan cheese because they add an anti-caking ingredient that simply ruins the taste of the cheese. 

**I used Impossible Meat because it has a great texture and flavor.  You can also use Gardein beef crumbles, or Hungry Planet beef.  You can also skip the meat if you’re not a fan of meat substitutes, but you may want to add an additional can of beans. I would add a can of pinto beans with my black beans for variety. 

These freeze well.  When I know I’m going to use them I remove them from the freezer and refrigerate overnight.  Always be careful putting a frozen, or super cold glass pan in the oven.  They can break. 

Keywords: Black Bean Enchilada, Vegan Enchiladas

Fish and Chips with Minty Mushy Peas

Fish and Chips with Minty Mushy Peas

It’s nice to be back in the kitchen! I’ve been super busy the last couple of weeks, and I am excited to be working on a few new recipes. Before I became a vegan, one of my favorite things to eat was fish at the local VFW hall on Fridays during the Lenten season. Though I’m not a Catholic, there are a few of their traditions that I really enjoyed! I tried using hearts of palm and other substitutes for fish. However, using banana blossoms has proved to be hands-down the best option! I like to add a bit of ground seaweed to the beer batter, which gives it a nice fishy flavor. I also love the minty mushy peas as a side! And last we cannot forget the chips! Large russet potatoes cut into thick batons and lightly fried make this girl super happy! 😋


Banana blossom, also known as a “banana heart,” is a fleshy, purple-skinned flower, shaped like a tear, which grows at the end of a banana fruit cluster. They are very flakey, making them a perfect substitute for fish. The family to whom banana belongs is called Musaceae as banana blossom, represent a valuable source of potassium, vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E, minerals, fatty acid content, flavonoids, saponin, essential and non-essential amino acid, tannins, glycoside, and steroid. Banana flower is also a good antioxidant source.


There is a little bit of prep that needs to be done ahead of time. So be sure to read through the whole recipe first. You can make the peas and tartar sauce as early as much as a day ahead. This is a perfect meat-free meal that even your fish-eating friends will love! Enjoy!


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Fish and Chips with Minty Mushy Peas

  • Author: Stephanie Bosch

Description

There is some prep for this recipe.  You will want to rinse the banana blossoms and get them in the freezer while you make the other ingredients.  Make the peas and tartar sauce first. And then make potatoes and the fish last.  


Scale

Ingredients

Peas:

  • 1 Tbsp unsalted butter
  • Zest of 1 lemon
  • 1/4 cup fresh mint leaves, minced
  • Salt, to taste
  • Black pepper, to taste

Fish:

  • 2 (18 oz) cans banana blossoms, drained and rinsed
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup rice flour (used as pre-coat; can use regular flour if needed)
  • 1 teaspoon kelp powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 3/4 cup beer (I used an IPA)
  • 3/4 cup seltzer or sparkling water
  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
  • Malt vinegar, for serving

Potatoes:

  • 4 russet potatoes, sliced each into 8 wedges
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 3 teaspoons garlic powder)
  • 2 teaspoon onion powder
  • 2 teaspoons salt, (adjust to your tastes)
  • 1/2 teaspoon black cracked pepper
  • 2 tablespoons fresh chopped parsley (garnish)

Vegan Tartar Sauce:

  • ¼ cup (58 g) vegan mayo
  • 1 tbsp (10 g) minced cornichons (small pickles)
  • 2 tsp (20 g) caper, roughly chopped
  • 1 tsp (5 ml) white vinegar
  • ½ tsp dijon
  • 1 tsp (2 g) fresh dill, chopped
  • Pinch salt and pepper

Instructions

Tartar Sauce:

Mix all ingredients  in a small bowl and refrigerate immediately. 

Peas:

  1. Bring 6 cups of generously salted water to a boil in a medium saucepan. Add the frozen peas and mint and cook for 4 minutes—Reserve 3 tablespoons of the hot cooking water. Drain the peas and mint and return to the pan. Immediately add butter, lemon zest, and cooking water—season with salt and pepper. Roughly mash the peas with a potato masher or food processor. Cover and set aside. You can use the peas in rough purée form, but if you want a very fine, smooth purée, push the mixture through a fine sieve. (I like to save about 1/4 cup of whole peas to add to puree). 

Potatoes:

  1. Preheat oven to 400°. Wash the potatoes (I did not peel mine) with cold water to remove some of the surface dirt and dry well. Slice potatoes in half lengthwise, slice each half in half again and then slice each half in half again. You should have a total of 8 slices per potato. Blanch the potatoes in hot (not boiling) water for 10-12 minutes to release their starches. You can skip this step, but your potatoes will not be as crisp.  
  2. Drain potatoes, shaking well to remove excess water. Lightly pat them dry and add potatoes to a medium-size bowl. Add olive oil and toss well. Combine spices in a small bowl and sprinkle over potatoes. Toss well to coat. Place potatoes cut side down on a parchment-lined baking sheet or in an *air fryer. (Depending on the size of your pan, you may have to use two baking sheets. If so, rotate pans when you pull them to flip the potatoes at the halfway baking point, about 30 minutes)
  3. Bake for 30 minutes. Remove from oven and, using a spatula, carefully flip the potatoes. Rotate pans if you used more than one. 
  4. Return to oven and bake for an additional 25-30 minutes. (You can reduce the oven to 200° and keep potatoes warm while fillets cook). 
  5. Sprinkle with parsley and serve hot. 

Fish:

  1. Heat oil in a dutch oven or wok to 345° F. Turn oven down to 200° F. Whisk together flour, baking soda, kelp powder, and 1 teaspoon salt. Pour in the beer, sparkling water, and lemon juice and mix just until combined (do not over-mix). Keep the batter refrigerated until ready to use. 
  2. Drain the banana blossoms, then shape them into filets. Wrap the blossoms in clean kitchen towels and squeeze out all of the brine.
  3. Cover and place in the freezer for 1 hour.
  4. Remove from the freezer and sprinkle the blossoms with salt and pepper. Coat the blossoms in rice flour and then dip into the batter to completely coat. Carefully swish the blossoms partway into the oil for a few seconds before completely releasing. Once the coating starts to set on the first fillet, you can add another battered fillet into the oil. Fry until the blossom is puffed, golden brown, and cooked through, 5 minutes for thin fillets or 7 minutes for thick fillets, and then transfer to a paper towel-lined plate. Cook the remaining fillets and sprinkle with salt. 
  5. To serve, reheat the mushy peas if necessary. Serve the fish with chips, mushy peas, and malt vinegar on the side.

Notes

*If using air fryer bake at 390°F for 12-15 minutes.  You will have to do this in batches so whey they’ve cooked you will need to place them in a low (200°F oven) to keep warm.  

Asada Mushroom Tacos

Asada Mushroom Tacos

I have an obsession with tacos, and my love for them is deep. Before I became a vegan, my absolute favorite taco was a simple Carne Asada taco with cilantro and white onion. A traditional Asada is made with flank steak. But alas, with those meat-eating days behind me, I’ve searched long and hard for a reasonable substitute. Enter the mighty portobello mushroom.

Mushrooms work great in this Asada because they love to soak up the flavor of a marinade. And flavor they shall have! My first version of this recipe used a whole chipotle pepper that I minced and added to the marinade. As a girl who likes her food spicy, I have to say the heat overshadows the mushrooms’ delicious umami flavor. So I cut back on the heat and kept it simple. This recipe goes down as one of my all-time favorite taco recipes using fresh cilantro leaves, freshly squeezed orange and lime juice, cumin, and chili powder.

If you don’t like cilantro, no worries, you can use epazote, another aromatic herb with notes of oregano, anise, citrus, and mint. You can find it at most Hispanic grocery stores or, of course, on Amazon! You can use a steak portobello mushrooms or I just used some sliced Cremini mushrooms that I already had. I will make these again when the weather warms up and throw some marinated portobellos on the grill! Enjoy!


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Asada Mushroom Tacos

  • Author: Stephanie Bosch
  • Prep Time: 30
  • Cook Time: 30
  • Total Time: 1 hour
  • Yield: 4 Tacos 1x

Description

Yummy Mushroom Asada tacos!   I used a pineapple jalapeño salsa as a topper and it was divine! 


Scale

Ingredients

  • 16 oz sliced portobello mushroom caps, or cremini mushrooms, stemmed and cleaned
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro leaves, or epazote
  • 1/3 cup olive oil
  • 1/4 cup Tamari, or liquid aminos
  • Juice of 1 orange
  • Juice of 1 lime
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 teaspoons chili powder
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon oregano
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Instructions

Marinade:

  • Whisk cilantro, orange juice, lime juice, aminos, olive oil, garlic, chili powder, cumin, oregano, salt, and pepper in a large bowl or shallow dish to combine.
  • Add the mushrooms and gently toss until they’re fully coated. Marinate in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes to an hour. (These can be made up to 24 hours ahead). Give the mushrooms a good toss every 10 to 15 minutes.
  • With a slotted spoon, remove mushrooms and reserve 1 cup of the marinade.
  • Heat a cast-iron or other large non-stick skillet over medium-high heat. When the pan is heated, add olive oil. Once the oil is shimmering, place the mushrooms in an even layer and cook, making sure not to touch them until most of the moisture has cooked out of them, about 10 minutes.
  • While the mushrooms are sautéing, warm the tortillas on a comal or other small non-stick skillet on the stovetop. Once tortillas are warmed and slightly browned, cover with a paper towel and place on a baking sheet in a low oven, or use the “warm hold” feature on the microwave. 
  • When most of the moisture has evaporated, add 1/2 cup of the marinade and stir. Continue to cook and repeat with remaining marinade, stirring often for another 5 to 10 minutes. The mushrooms should be caramelized and slightly crisped around the edges.
  • Serve on warm tortillas and top with salsa, cilantro. 

Cuban Black Beans & Rice

Cuban Black Beans & Rice

This dish is a perfect accompaniment to my Ropa Vieja, or it’s an easy meal served by itself! I used canned beans to make it a quick weeknight meal-It can be ready in 25 minutes or less! But if you have the time you can slow cook your beans for an extra layer of flavor.

Black beans are legumes. Also known as turtle beans because of their formidable, shell-like appearance, black beans are, in fact, the edible seeds of the plant. Black beans are rich in carbohydrates, and they are also an excellent source of fiber (both soluble and insoluble). Black beans also do not contain sugar. So depending on how they’re cooked, they can have a low glycemic index. Black beans are also protein powerhouses, with 7 grams of protein in a 1/2 cup serving!

If you want a little heat feel free to add a jalapeño, or your favorite hot sauce! I like to serve this with a long grain white rice. Enjoy!


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Cuban Black Beans & Rice

  • Author: Stephanie Bosch

Scale

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 large onion, finely chopped
  • 1 large green bell pepper, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 1 jalapeño, seeded and minced (optional)
  • 4 large garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 tablespoon dried oregano
  • 2 15- to 16-ounce cans black beans, rinsed, drained
  • 3/4 cup vegetable broth 
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons cider vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • Long-grain rice, to serve

Instructions

  1. Heat a heavy large saucepan over medium heat.
  2. When the pan is sufficiently heated, add oil. When oil begins to shimmer, add onion, bell pepper, jalapeño, if using, and oregano and sauté until vegetables start to soften about 5 minutes.
  3. Add garlic and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds. 
  4. Add 1 cup of beans to the pan. Using the back of a fork, mash beans coarsely.
  5. Add remaining beans, broth, and vinegar and simmer until mixture thickens and flavors blend, stirring occasionally about 15 minutes. 
  6. Season beans to taste with salt and pepper.
  7. Long-grain rice, to serve.

Ropa Vieja

Ropa Vieja

I’ve always been fascinated with Cuba. Perhaps because it remains a romantically forbidden destination, or maybe because Hemingway wrote two of my favorite novels there. Or, maybe it’s the food. Enter the Ropa Vieja.

Considered Cuba’s national dish, its name translates to ‘old clothes,’ and the story goes that a destitute old man once shredded and cooked his clothes because he could not afford food for his family. He prayed over the bubbling concoction, and a miracle occurred, turning the mixture into a tasty, rich meat stew. Generally made with flank steak, this vegan version uses the ever-versatile Jackfruit. For our Ropa Vieja recipe, we’re also adding an array of other classic Cuban and Spanish ingredients such as olives and pimentos.

Ropa Vieja only tastes better the next day as the flavors have more time to meld, so this is a perfect dish to make in large batches for leftovers! I like to serve it over Cuban black beans and cilantro rice. If you can find them, fried plantains called Maduro’s make an excellent accompaniment as well!


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Ropa Vieja

  • Author: Stephanie Bosch
  • Prep Time: 20
  • Cook Time: 1 hour
  • Total Time: 1 hour 20 minutes
  • Yield: 6 cups 1x
  • Cuisine: Cuban
  • Diet: Vegan

Scale

Ingredients

  • 2 cans young green jackfruit, drained and dried
  • 1 “not beef” bouillon cube
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 1 large onion, halved and sliced thin
  • 1 red bell pepper, sliced into 1/4” thin strips
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 4 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
  • 1/2 cup dry wine (I used red wine)
  • 2 teaspoons smoked paprika
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons dried oregano
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1 28-ounce can whole peeled tomatoes
  • 1 large bay leaf
  • 1/2 cup pimiento-stuffed Spanish olives, halved crosswise
  • 1 teaspoons distilled white vinegar
  • Avocado, sliced in half
  • Chopped cilantro
  • Serve with cilantro white rice, maduros, and Cuban black beans 

Instructions

  1. Place a rack in lower third of oven; preheat to 250°.
  2. Drain jackfruit and dry with a towel.
  3. Mix bouillon cube with 1/2 cup of hot water.
  4. Heat oil in a large heatproof pot over high.
  5. Cook jackfruit, turning occasionally, until browned on all sides, 5–7 minutes.  Add bouillon mixture to pan and scrape and bits of jackfruit stuck to the bottom of a pan. Stir in 2 tablespoons of tomato paste.  Mix well.  Cook for 2-3 minutes.  Transfer to a mixing bowl.
  6. In the same pan add remaining tablespoon of oil and cook onion, bell peppers. Add salt, stirring occasionally, until softened and beginning to brown, 12–14 minutes. Add garlic and cook, stirring frequently and scraping bottom of pan, until vegetables are golden brown, 3–5 minutes.
  7. Stir in wine and cook, stirring occasionally, until evaporated.
  8. Stir in paprika, oregano, cumin, black pepper, and cayenne until vegetables are coated; continue to cook, stirring, until spices are fragrant, about 1 minute.
  9. Add tomatoes and coarsely break up with a spoon (they’ll continue to break down as they cook). Bring to a boil and cook, stirring occasionally, until liquid is reduced by half, about 5 minutes.
  10. Add jackfruit back into vegetable mixture with bay leaf.
  11. Cover and transfer to oven. Braise until jackfruit and vegetables are very tender about 30 minutes. Let cool 15 minutes.
  12. Discard bay leaves. Using a potato masher or 2 forks, tear and smash jackfruit into sauce until it’s shredded and incorporated into sauce.
  13. Stir in olives and vinegar.

 

Divide Ropa Vieja among plates. Top with cilantro. Serve with avocado, Maduros, and Cuban black beans and rice, alongside.


Purple Sweet Potato Soup with Roasted Cauliflower and Tarragon

Purple Sweet Potato Soup with Roasted Cauliflower and Tarragon


I have a potato obsession. But my favorite potato is the mighty sweet potato. Unlike a regular potato, a nightshade family member, the sweet potato is a large edible root within the morning glory family. And sweet potatoes come in many colors too!

While potatoes with orange flesh are the richest in beta-carotene. Sweet potatoes with purple flesh are richer in anthocyanins. Beta-carotene and anthocyanins are naturally occurring plant “Phyto” chemicals that give vegetables their bright colors. Phytochemicals are biologically active compounds found in plants and are known to:

  • Aid the function of the immune system.
  • Protect cells and DNA from damage that may lead to cancer.
  • Reduce inflammation.
  • Slow the growth rate of some cancer cells.
  • Help regulate hormones.

Why use a purple potato? Because anthocyanins have the capacity to lower blood pressure, improve visual acuity, reduce cancer cell proliferation, inhibit tumor formation, prevent diabetes, and lower the risk of CVD, which modulates cognitive and motor function.

This pretty warm winter soup was inspired by another anthocyanin…the açaí bowl!. It’s super healthy comes together very quickly. You can easily make this a “no-oil” soup by steaming your vegetables instead of roasting them. 

If you choose to use oil, be sure to keep the temperature well below the oil’s smoke point or the point at which the oil starts to burn (that’s about 410 degrees for extra virgin or unrefined olive oil). Because overheating oil breaks down the nutritional composition of the oil changes the flavor, and releases harmful free radicals. 


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Purple Sweet Potato Soup with Roasted Cauliflower and Tarragon

  • Author: Stephanie Bosch

Description

I added a delicious beet puree to this soup, but you can add whatever you want.  Good choices might be pieces of roasted cauliflower, pumpkins seeds, hemp seeds, or soy cream. 


Scale

Ingredients

  • 3 large purple sweet potatoes, peeled and medium diced
  • 1 large head of organic cauliflower, chopped into medium florets
  • 2 large leeks, white part only, thinly sliced
  • 2 cloves garlic, mined
  • 2 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1 teaspoon dried tarragon
  • 2 tablespoons fresh tarragon
  • 1 (32 oz) container organic vegetable stock
  • salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 400°.
  2. Add chopped potatoes and cauliflower to a mixing bowl and toss with 1 tablespoon of olive oil. 
  3. Add spices to a small bowl and mix well. 
  4. Spread vegetables evenly on a parchment-lined baking sheet. 
  5. Sprinkle the spice mix over vegetables. Place baking sheet in the oven, and roast vegetable for 30 minutes, turning vegetables at the half-way mark. 
  6. When vegetables are done, remove from oven and let cool. 
  7. Warm a dutch oven over medium heat. When the pan is heated, add oil. When oil begins to shimmer, add the leeks and saute until leeks have softened and are slightly brown. 
  8. Add garlic and sauté until fragrant, about 30 seconds to a minute. 
  9. Add cooled vegetables and vegetable stock to a dutch oven, and stir. 
  10. When the soup is warmed, use an immersion blender, or carefully ladle half of the soup mixture into a blender. (If using a high-speed blender, be careful to hold the lid, as the heat can build pressure and the lid can fly off). Continue until all the soup is blended to the consistency you prefer. **I blended the first batch until entirely smooth. For the second batch, I blended it to have some texture and then mixed the two. 
  11. Return to dutch oven and taste for seasoning. 
  12. Serve warm and top with fresh tarragon, roasted cauliflower, hemp seeds, pumpkins seeds (pepita’s), or beet puree. 

Notes

**While blending the soup, I placed the first pureed batch into a large mixing bowl.  

White Bean Chili with Cumin and Green Chilies

White Bean Chili with Cumin and Green Chilies

I love chili on a cold winter’s day! This chili was a favorite of ours until we went vegan. I felt so overwhelmed in the beginning that many recipes sat on the proverbial shelf. This recipe was one of them, until now! 

I love soy curls! I had heard about them for several years but never bought any. Then one day, I found myself craving an old favorite, the carne asada taco. After perusing dozens of vegan recipes, I discovered one using soy curls. I bought them and well, the rest they say, is history. Since then, I’ve used them in making fajitas, Chili Verdes, and now, in this white bean chili. 

My old recipe used chicken, of course, and white cheese. This new version uses the soy curls and my béchamel sauce. I always keep a container of the sauce in my freezer, so that’s what I used. If you want a nut-free version, then soy cream is a great option. I added a bit of chili powder at the end, too, just for a little kick!


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White Bean Chili with Cumin and Green Chilies

  • Author: Stephanie Bosch
  • Prep Time: 10
  • Cook Time: 20
  • Total Time: 30 minutes
  • Yield: 6 cups 1x

Scale

Ingredients

  • 1 medium white onion, diced
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic , finely minced
  • 1 (32 oz) container organic vegetable broth
  • 1 (8 oz) package of Butler’s soy curls (or other favorite brand)
  • 1 (7 oz) can diced green chilies
  • 1 1/2 tsp cumin
  • 1/2 tsp paprika
  • 1/2 tsp dried oregano
  • 1/2 tsp ground coriander
  • 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 1 cup soy cream or béchamel sauce
  • 1 1/4 cup frozen or fresh corn
  • 3 (15 oz) cans white chili beans*
  • 1 Tbsp fresh lime juice
  • 2 Tbsp chopped fresh cilantro, plus more for serving
  • Tortilla chips or strips, monterrey jack cheese, sliced avocado for serving (optional)

Instructions

  1. In a medium bowl, add soy curls and cover with 32 oz. of vegetable stock. Let sit until soy curls have rehydrated, about 10 minutes. Set aside.
  2. Warm a dutch oven over medium heat. When heated, add oil. When the oil is shimmering, add onion and sauté until onions are translucent, about 7-8 minutes. 
  3. When soy curls have rehydrated, use a slotted spoon and remove soy curls from stock (reserving stock). Add soy curls to the pan and sauté until brown (about 7-8 minutes). If the curls begin to stick, add stock 2 tablespoons at a time. 
  4. Add garlic, and sauté until fragrant—about 30 seconds. 
  5. Add spices and green chilis to the pan. Dry sauté for approximately 1-2 minutes, or until spices are fragrant. 
  6. Add vegetable broth and deglaze the pan. (Stir the bottom of the pan and removed all fond)
  7. Add white chili beans and corn. Stir well.  
  8. Cook chili until ingredients have warmed. About 15 minutes. 
  9. Add soy cream or béchamel sauce and stir until warmed through. 
  10. Check for seasoning and serve warm.
  11. Top with vegan sour cream, avocados, and cilantro, diced onions, optional. 
  12.  

Notes

*I used white chili beans in a mild sauce.

Chickpea “Tuna” Stacks with Tomato and Avocado

Chickpea “Tuna” Stacks with Tomato and Avocado

When we first became plant-based eaters, we came across a simple recipe for a chickpea salad from the fine folks at Forks Over Knives! This recipe turns out to be from my absolute favorite food blogger in the whole world, Minimalist Baker. It is hands down the best chickpea “tuna” salad recipe I’ve found. I’ve made no modifications to their recipe, but I did make a stack out of it!

Now, I have a set of food rings that I use to stack, but you can use any round container ( a 1/2 or 1-cup dry measuring cup would work great). A quick note, though, if you’re using something with a bottom, you have to assemble your stack backward. So, if you want the tomatoes on top, you have to put them in first. 

For this stack, I small diced tomatoes and red onions (uniformity is key to a pretty stack) and small cubed avocado, tossed in lemon juice, and added salt. I also added cilantro to my tomatoes and topped the stack with radish microgreens. And as always, we double our batches of the salad! It’s so yummy! Enjoy!

Chickpea Tuna Stack

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Chickpea “Tuna” Stacks

  • Author: Recipe from Minimalist Baker, adapted by Stephanie Bosch

Description

This recipe is made using the Minimalist Baker’s Chickpea Salad!  We always double our batches! 


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Ingredients

  • 1 (15-ounce) can chickpeas, rinsed and drained
  • 3 tablespoons tahini
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon or spicy brown mustard
  • 1 tablespoon maple syrup or agave nectar
  • ¼ cup diced red onion
  • ¼ cup diced celery
  • ¼ cup diced pickle
  • 1 teaspoon capers, drained and loosely chopped
  • Healthy pinch each sea salt and black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon roasted unsalted sunflower seeds (optional)

*Stacks: (see note)

  • 1/2 roma tomato, seeds removed, small dice
  • 2 tablespoons red onion, small diced
  • 1 teaspoon lemon or lime juice, divided in half
  • 1 teaspoon salt, divided in half
  • 1 tablespoon, minced cilantro
  • 1/2 avocado, small diced

 


Instructions

    1. Place the chickpeas in a mixing bowl and mash with a fork, leaving only a few beans whole. For this, I use my food chopper from Pampered Chef. 
    2. Add tahini, mustard, maple syrup, red onion, celery, pickle, capers, salt and pepper, and sunflower seeds (if using) to the mixing bowl. Mix to incorporate. Taste and adjust seasonings as needed.

    *Stacks: (see note)

    1. In a small bowl, add tomatoes, red onion, 1/2 lemon/lime juice, 1/2 the salt, and cilantro. Mix well.
    2. In another bowl, add avocados, the other 1/2 of the lemon/lime juice, and 1/2 the salt. Mix well. 
    3. If using a food ring, fill ring 1/3 full with avocado, repeat the next two layers using chickpeas, and  tomatoes. Press firmly and remove the ring. Top with microgreens and cilantro. 
    4. If using a round mold with a bottom–trace and cut a piece of parchment or waxed paper to fit inside the mold. Add tomatoes, chickpea salad, and finish with avocados. Press firmly, but not too hard. Carefully use a knife to score the edges of the stack and flip mold. Remove parchment paper. Reassemble any pieces that have fallen away. There may be a few, no worries! Top with microgreens and cilantro. 
    5. Enjoy! 

 

 


Notes

*This is for one stack.

You can freeze what you don’t use, otherwise, l keep it covered in refrigerator for 4-5 days.  

Hot Cocoa with Whipped Cream

Hot Cocoa with Whipped Cream

I love cold weather. I love snow. And I love hot cocoa. Since it’s cold and it snowed, the only thing missing was this recipe! There isn’t much to say other than you probably have all the ingredients on hand to make it! I like this brand of cocoa powder and this brand of oat milk. 

You can double or triple the batch and easily warm up for more later! ENJOY!!! You can also add the whipped cream to a piping bag, swirl it over the cocoa and top with cinnamon, or cocoa powder! Also this whipped cream is light and fluffy and stays creamy for days in the fridge or months in the freezer as a vegan cool whip. Just take it out of the freezer and let it warm up for about 10 minutes before using.


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Hot Cocoa with Whipped Cream

  • Author: Stephanie Bosch
  • Cook Time: 5
  • Total Time: 5
  • Yield: 2 cups 1x
  • Diet: Vegan

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Ingredients

  1. 2 cups plant-based milk
  2. 2 tablespoons cocoa powder
  3. 3 tablespoons vegan sugar
  4. pinch cinnamon
  5. pinch cayenne pepper

 

Whipped cream:

  1. 1/4 cup aquafaba (I used the juice from a can of garbanzo beans)
  2. 2 Tbsp vegan sugar (can also use powdered sugar) 
  3. 1 tsp cream of tartar
  4. pinch of salt
  5. 1/4 tsp vanilla

Instructions

  • In a small sauce pan heat all ingredients on low until warm. Whisk to combine.  Heat until warm. 
  • Put aquafaba in stand mixer and mix on high for 4-5 minutes.
  • Add in cream of tartar and salt, and then and add sugar very slowly.
  • When peaks have formed, add vanilla. Takes about 8-10 minutes.

Notes

This recipe i

Easy Vegan Naan

I love naan! It’s the first thing I think about when I know I’m getting indian food. It’s the Indian equivalent to Mexican chips. Naan is a leavened, oven-baked flatbread found in the cuisines mainly of Western Asia, South Asia, Indonesia, Myanmar and the Caribbean. And if you have a pizza oven you’ll love this recipe!

When you may look at the directions, you may think that it’s not very easy, but trust me, as a girl who is nothing close to being a baker, even I can do it. There are several essential things to note, however. The first is to pay attention to the kind of yeast you’re using. If using active dry yeast and instant (or rapid-rise) yeast, you can use them interchangeably in recipes, but active dry yeast needs to be dissolved in water before using, while you can mix instant yeast right into the dough. Also, instant yeast doesn’t have to be proofed first. 

“Proofed” means sitting in a warm, happy place, allowing the dough to rise. Instant yeast may also be marketed and sold as rapid- or quick-rise yeast. Enzymes and other additives are included to make the dough rise faster. With this yeast, you can skip the dough’s first rise and shape the loaves right after kneading. “Active” describes any dry yeast that needs to be activated before use, hence the warm water. You can use either. I used the active dry because it’s what I have on hand. 

The other thing to note is the pan you use. You can use a regular cast iron pan, or if you’re like me, and make your tortillas, you will want to use a comal. The comal is a Mexican style grill or griddle, and unlike a regular cast iron pan, it is thin. It heats up efficiently and retains the heat, making it a favorable tool for recipes that require high, stable heat. Hence, the perfect pan for naan!


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Easy Vegan Naan

  • Author: Stephanie Bosch
  • Prep Time: 30
  • Cook Time: 1-2 minutes
  • Total Time: 11 minute
  • Yield: 8 pieces 1x
  • Diet: Vegan

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Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup warm water or vegan milk (not hot or it will kill the yeast)
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons dry active yeast 
  • 1 teaspoon organic vegan cane sugar
  • 2 1/2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour 
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 3/4 teaspoon baking powder
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/4 cup plain dairy-free yogurt or coconut cream
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • Cilantro, minced

Instructions

  1. Measure warm water or milk, add yeast and sugar. Stir and set aside until foamy (about 10 minutes.)
  2. Meanwhile, add flour, salt, and baking powder to a large mixing bowl and whisk to combine.
  3. Once the yeast mixture is foaming, add the vegan yogurt or cream and oil, and stir to combine. Add to dry ingredients. I used a wooden spoon to stir – the dough will be sticky.
  4. Turn onto a floured surface (I used my countertop) and knead just enough flour to the dough to form into a loose ball (about 2-3 minutes). Add a bit more flour if too sticky. Alternatively, you can use a stand mixer with a dough hook. 
  5. Place back in mixing bowl and rub with a bit of oil, turn to coat.
  6. Cover with a damp towel or plastic wrap and set in a warm place for at least 2 hours (I put mine in the oven since my oven has a proof feature which sets the range to 100°.) You can also heat your oven to its lowest setting, turn off the heat, and put the bowl in the cooling oven. 
  7. Remove dough from bowl and turn onto a floured surface. Knead for 30 seconds (adding additional flour if sticky). Then divide into eight even pieces using a knife or pastry cutter. 
  8. Lightly knead each ball until it forms a loose ball and place it on parchment paper. Repeat until each piece of dough is formed into a ball. Cover with a towel and let rest for 10 minutes.
  9. Prep cilantro and/or other fresh herbs such as rosemary or thyme.
  10. When the dough has rested, begin heating a cast-iron pan (I used a comal) over medium heat.
  11. Roll out into an oval or circle with a rolling pin. Carefully flip dough and pat with a bit of water to prevent sticking to the pan. Press the garlic and herbs/cilantro into the dough until it sticks. Then place the wet-side down on the hot pan.
  12. Cook until the edges of the dough look dry and it’s beginning to bubble. Then flip the dough with a spatula and cook until the underside is brown. 
  13. Repeat until all naan is cooked. 
  14. Brush each flatbread with vegan butter; top with sesame seeds, minced garlic, or fresh herbs.
  15. Serve immediately.
  16.