Purple Sweet Potato Soup with Roasted Cauliflower and Tarragon

Purple Sweet Potato Soup with Roasted Cauliflower and Tarragon


I have a potato obsession. But my favorite potato is the mighty sweet potato. Unlike a regular potato, a nightshade family member, the sweet potato is a large edible root within the morning glory family. And sweet potatoes come in many colors too!

While potatoes with orange flesh are the richest in beta-carotene. Sweet potatoes with purple flesh are richer in anthocyanins. Beta-carotene and anthocyanins are naturally occurring plant “Phyto” chemicals that give vegetables their bright colors. Phytochemicals are biologically active compounds found in plants and are known to:

  • Aid the function of the immune system.
  • Protect cells and DNA from damage that may lead to cancer.
  • Reduce inflammation.
  • Slow the growth rate of some cancer cells.
  • Help regulate hormones.

Why use a purple potato? Because anthocyanins have the capacity to lower blood pressure, improve visual acuity, reduce cancer cell proliferation, inhibit tumor formation, prevent diabetes, and lower the risk of CVD, which modulates cognitive and motor function.

This pretty warm winter soup was inspired by another anthocyanin…the açaí bowl!. It’s super healthy comes together very quickly. You can easily make this a “no-oil” soup by steaming your vegetables instead of roasting them. 

If you choose to use oil, be sure to keep the temperature well below the oil’s smoke point or the point at which the oil starts to burn (that’s about 410 degrees for extra virgin or unrefined olive oil). Because overheating oil breaks down the nutritional composition of the oil changes the flavor, and releases harmful free radicals. 


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Purple Sweet Potato Soup with Roasted Cauliflower and Tarragon

  • Author: Stephanie Bosch

Description

I added a delicious beet puree to this soup, but you can add whatever you want.  Good choices might be pieces of roasted cauliflower, pumpkins seeds, hemp seeds, or soy cream. 


Ingredients

Scale
  • 3 large purple sweet potatoes, peeled and medium diced
  • 1 large head of organic cauliflower, chopped into medium florets
  • 2 large leeks, white part only, thinly sliced
  • 2 cloves garlic, mined
  • 2 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1 teaspoon dried tarragon
  • 2 tablespoons fresh tarragon
  • 1 (32 oz) container organic vegetable stock
  • salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 400°.
  2. Add chopped potatoes and cauliflower to a mixing bowl and toss with 1 tablespoon of olive oil. 
  3. Add spices to a small bowl and mix well. 
  4. Spread vegetables evenly on a parchment-lined baking sheet. 
  5. Sprinkle the spice mix over vegetables. Place baking sheet in the oven, and roast vegetable for 30 minutes, turning vegetables at the half-way mark. 
  6. When vegetables are done, remove from oven and let cool. 
  7. Warm a dutch oven over medium heat. When the pan is heated, add oil. When oil begins to shimmer, add the leeks and saute until leeks have softened and are slightly brown. 
  8. Add garlic and sauté until fragrant, about 30 seconds to a minute. 
  9. Add cooled vegetables and vegetable stock to a dutch oven, and stir. 
  10. When the soup is warmed, use an immersion blender, or carefully ladle half of the soup mixture into a blender. (If using a high-speed blender, be careful to hold the lid, as the heat can build pressure and the lid can fly off). Continue until all the soup is blended to the consistency you prefer. **I blended the first batch until entirely smooth. For the second batch, I blended it to have some texture and then mixed the two. 
  11. Return to dutch oven and taste for seasoning. 
  12. Serve warm and top with fresh tarragon, roasted cauliflower, hemp seeds, pumpkins seeds (pepita’s), or beet puree. 

Notes

**While blending the soup, I placed the first pureed batch into a large mixing bowl.  

White Bean Chili with Cumin and Green Chilies

White Bean Chili with Cumin and Green Chilies

I love chili on a cold winter’s day! This chili was a favorite of ours until we went vegan. I felt so overwhelmed in the beginning that many recipes sat on the proverbial shelf. This recipe was one of them, until now! 

I love soy curls! I had heard about them for several years but never bought any. Then one day, I found myself craving an old favorite, the carne asada taco. After perusing dozens of vegan recipes, I discovered one using soy curls. I bought them and well, the rest they say, is history. Since then, I’ve used them in making fajitas, Chili Verdes, and now, in this white bean chili. 

My old recipe used chicken, of course, and white cheese. This new version uses the soy curls and my béchamel sauce. I always keep a container of the sauce in my freezer, so that’s what I used. If you want a nut-free version, then soy cream is a great option. I added a bit of chili powder at the end, too, just for a little kick!


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White Bean Chili with Cumin and Green Chilies

  • Author: Stephanie Bosch
  • Prep Time: 10
  • Cook Time: 20
  • Total Time: 30 minutes
  • Yield: 6 cups 1x

Ingredients

Scale
  • 1 medium white onion, diced
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic , finely minced
  • 1 (32 oz) container organic vegetable broth
  • 1 (8 oz) package of Butler’s soy curls (or other favorite brand)
  • 1 (7 oz) can diced green chilies
  • 1 1/2 tsp cumin
  • 1/2 tsp paprika
  • 1/2 tsp dried oregano
  • 1/2 tsp ground coriander
  • 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 1 cup soy cream or béchamel sauce
  • 1 1/4 cup frozen or fresh corn
  • 3 (15 oz) cans white chili beans*
  • 1 Tbsp fresh lime juice
  • 2 Tbsp chopped fresh cilantro, plus more for serving
  • Tortilla chips or strips, monterrey jack cheese, sliced avocado for serving (optional)

Instructions

  1. In a medium bowl, add soy curls and cover with 32 oz. of vegetable stock. Let sit until soy curls have rehydrated, about 10 minutes. Set aside.
  2. Warm a dutch oven over medium heat. When heated, add oil. When the oil is shimmering, add onion and sauté until onions are translucent, about 7-8 minutes. 
  3. When soy curls have rehydrated, use a slotted spoon and remove soy curls from stock (reserving stock). Add soy curls to the pan and sauté until brown (about 7-8 minutes). If the curls begin to stick, add stock 2 tablespoons at a time. 
  4. Add garlic, and sauté until fragrant—about 30 seconds. 
  5. Add spices and green chilis to the pan. Dry sauté for approximately 1-2 minutes, or until spices are fragrant. 
  6. Add vegetable broth and deglaze the pan. (Stir the bottom of the pan and removed all fond)
  7. Add white chili beans and corn. Stir well.  
  8. Cook chili until ingredients have warmed. About 15 minutes. 
  9. Add soy cream or béchamel sauce and stir until warmed through. 
  10. Check for seasoning and serve warm.
  11. Top with vegan sour cream, avocados, and cilantro, diced onions, optional. 
  12.  

Notes

*I used white chili beans in a mild sauce.

Carla’s Creamy Asparagus Pea Soup

Carla’s Creamy Asparagus Pea Soup

My friend Carla asked me for this recipe the other day. I had made this soup for a cooking class once, and she loved it! However, the recipe has taken a few twists and turns since the class. Each time I make it, I think to myself, “It’s close, but no cigar.” I finally realized what was missing when I added a small jalapeño to the mix of roasted veggies!

 The soup is delicious, either hot or cold, and can be served as a winter warmer or cold as an early spring delight! Either way, you can’t go wrong. The other best part? It takes less than 30 minutes to make! You can leave the jalapeño if you like a little heat or remove it if you don’t.  Here you go Carla!


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Creamy Asparagus and Pea Soup

  • Author: Stephanie Bosch
  • Prep Time: 5
  • Cook Time: 20
  • Total Time: 25 minutes
  • Yield: 4 Cups 1x
  • Category: Soup
  • Diet: Vegan

Ingredients

Scale
  • 2 Tbsp olive or avocado oil
  • 12 ounces asparagus (1 large bundle) bottom of stocks, removed
  • 4 cloves garlic , peeled
  • 1 sweet Vidalia onion, peeled and quartered
  • 1 jalapeño, top and seeds removed
  • 10 fresh tarragon leaves, or 1/2 teaspoon dried tarragon
  • 10 ounces fresh or frozen peas (2 cups yield ~10 ounces)
  • 1 tsp Salt + 1/2 tsp Pepper
  • 1 cup cashew cream (can also use plant-based milk, just won’t be as creamy)
  • 4 cups vegetable broth (DIY or store-bought)
  • 12 Tbsp nutritional yeast (optional // for a slightly cheesy flavor)
  • 1/2 medium lemon (optional // juiced // for brightness)

    Instructions

    1. Preheat oven to 400°. 
    2. Prepare a parchment-lined baking sheet.
    3. In a medium bowl, add trimmed asparagus, quartered onion, garlic cloves, tarragon, and jalapeño. Toss with avocado oil.
    4. Add all ingredients to the baking sheet. *See Note
    5. Bake for 10 minutes, remove from oven, turn vegetables. Return to oven and bake for an additional 10 minutes. 
    6. When vegetables are done, reserve 8 asparagus tips.  Then and add remaining ingredients to a blender with the peas and half of the vegetable stock. Be sure to hold the blender lid when blending as the heat and pressure can build, and the top will fly off. (It’s happened). When mixed well, add purée to a dutch oven over medium heat. Then add remaining stock, nutritional yeast, salt, pepper, and cashew cream.  Simmer until warmed through.  Finish soup with lemon juice.   Taste for seasonings. 
    7. Serve with croutons and asparagus tips.

    Notes

    *I like to stack my tarragon and garlic pieces on top of the asparagus to keep them from having direct contact with pan.  It helps to prevent them from burning.  


    Nutrition

    • Serving Size: 4 cups
    • Calories: 298

    Curried Dal with Spinach and Sweet Potato

    Curried Dal with Spinach and Sweet Potato

    We are so fortunate to have the best Indian grocery store not too far from our house. There are aisles upon aisles of spices, rice, and about a hundred kinds of dal! Dal is often translated as “lentils” but refers to a split version of various lentils, peas, chickpeas (chana), kidney beans, and so on. If a pulse, or bean, is split in half, it is called a dal. So the chana dal that I used for this recipe is a split chickpea! 

    To me, the best part of this recipe was the addition of whole spices. Imagine how good your kitchen will smell while sautéing onions, cloves, a whole cinnamon stick, and cardamom. Delicious! You can use any green on hand, I just happened to have some spinach that needed to be used, but kale is a great option, too.

    This is an easy recipe for the Instant pot too. Use the sauté feature to cook the onions and spices. Then pick-up the recipe at step three and cook on high for 15 minutes. I cubed and browned my sweet potatoes before adding them to the lentils. If you don’t roast them or brown them first, you run the risk of them becoming mushy. 


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    Curried Dal with Spinach and Sweet Potato

    • Author: Stephanie Bosch
    • Prep Time: 5
    • Cook Time: 25
    • Total Time: 30 minutes
    • Yield: 68 cups 1x

    Description

    Curried dal is deliciously satisfying and super easy to make!  You will also have plenty of leftovers!  Serve with warmed naan or toasted bread. 


    Ingredients

    Scale
    • 1 pound dal
    • 3 green cardamom pods
    • 3 tablespoons coconut oil
    • 1 cinnamon stick
    • 3 whole cloves
    • 1 medium onion, halved and thinly sliced
    • 4 cloves garlic, crushed
    • 1 tablespoon peeled and grated ginger
    • 1 Serrano chile, stemmed and finely sliced
    • 1 sweet potato, peeled and cubed 
    • 1/3 cup yellow curry paste
    • 1/2 teaspoon ground turmeric
    • 10 oz fresh baby spinach
    • ½ teaspoon mustard seeds
    • 2 tablespoons unsweetened shredded coconut
    • 2 teaspoons kosher salt
    • 1 lime, juiced
    • 1 full 15 oz can full fat coconut milk
    • Rice
    • Garnish with yogurt, and cilantro, and smoked paprika

    Instructions

    1. Rinse the lentils in a strainer in cold water until the water runs clear, then place in a medium bowl, cover with water, and set aside. Using the side of a knife, carefully crack open the cardamom pods.
    2. Add 1 tablespoon of the coconut oil into a large pot over medium heat. When hot, add the cardamom pods, cinnamon stick, and cloves. Cook for about a minute, then add the onions. Cook for 10 minutes, stirring frequently until the onions are browning and soft. Add garlic, ginger, and chile and stir-fry for 1 to 2 minutes. Remove cinnamon stick. 
    3. Drain lentils and add to the pot; add turmeric, curry paste, and 4 1/4 cups of hot water. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Once they are boiling, reduce the heat to low and simmer for 20 to 25 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the lentils are soft and creamy.
    4. While lentils are cooking, warm a skillet over medium heat. Add 1 tablespoon of coconut oil, and when shimmering, add sweet potatoes. Brown potatoes on all sides and cook until they are almost fork tender. Remove from pan and set aside. 
    5. In the same pan, add the remaining tablespoon of coconut oil over medium heat and, when shimmering, add the mustard seeds. When the seeds pop, add the reserved onion mixture and fry for 1 to 2 minutes. Add the spinach, shredded coconut, and 1/2 teaspoon of the salt—Cook for 1 minute. Add the lime juice and stir.
    6. When the lentils are soft and creamy, add the coconut milk and remaining salt.  Add spinach mixture and sweet potatoes—taste for seasoning.  Cook for 5 more minutes, or until potatoes have warmed through.  I added just a bit more curry paste to mine, but I like heat!  Serve in a bowl, and spoon over rice. Top with yogurt, cilantro, and smoked paprika.

    T-Kat’s Chile Verde

    The other day my friend Kathy asked for a Chile Verde recipe. The truth is, I’d never made it before. Strange, I know, considering Mexican food is my all time number one favorite food. After several hours of watching YouTube videos of mostly non-english speaking women, I set out to make this delectable dish.

    Do you know the difference is between “chili” and”chile”? In American English, “chili” is the most common spelling for the spicy peppers and the stew. In British English the preferred spelling is “chilli.” In Spanish speaking countries and regions of the US, “chile” is the most common variant. Because I spent several hours watching YouTube videos of Spanish speaking ladies making this authentic and delectable dish, we are going to call it chile!

    A traditional Chile Verde is made with pork shoulder and potatoes simmered in a spicy green chili sauce. Aside from the obvious, there were several traditional elements that I found muy importante in making this recipe. The first being the use of the molcajete, or the Mexican mortar and pestle. If you don’t have one, don’t worry. You can simply cut your ingredients into thin slices, then give them a good smashing with the underside of your favorite coffee mug (the heavier the mug, the better), or add the ingredients to a ziplock bag and use a rolling pin.

    I slow simmered browned soy curls and potatoes in the green verde sauce, which is made from garlic, onion, cilantro, four kinds of peppers, and roasted tomatillo’s. Ahhhmaaazing! Here ya are, Miss Kathy!


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    T-Kat’s Chile Verde

    • Author: Stephanie Bosch
    • Prep Time: 15
    • Cook Time: 45
    • Total Time: 1 hour
    • Yield: 68 cups 1x

    Description

    Vegan version of Chile Verdes!   Even your pork loving friends will be amazed at this deliciously savory and hearty dish! 


    Ingredients

    Scale
     

    For Verde Sauce:

    • 1 1/2 pounds of tomatillos (about 8 or 9), husks removed
    • 4 cups organic vegetable broth
    • 2 serrano peppers
    • 2 jalapeno peppers
    • 2 poblano peppers 
    • 1 1/2 cups cilantro, stemmed
    • 1/4 onion
    • 1 1/2 cloves of whole fresh garlic, peeled
    • 1 additional clove of whole fresh garlic, peeled
    • 1/2 onion julienned

    For Chile:

    • 2 medium russet potatoes, peeled and cubed into bite size pieces
    • 1 bag of Butler brand soy curls
    • 1/2 onion, julienned
    • 2 teaspoons oregano
    • 2 teaspoons fine sea salt
    • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
    • 1 teaspoon black pepper
    • 2 tablespoons flour (I used a gf brown rice flour)

    Instructions

    Sauce:

    Preheat oven to 475°.

    1. Add tomatillos to a lined baking sheet and roast for 15-20 minutes, or until browned. Remove from oven to cool.  When cooled slice in half. 
    2. White tomatillos are in the oven; add broth, whole peppers, 1/4 onion, and 1 1/2 cloves of garlic to a large saucepan and bring to a boil. Reduce heat, and simmer on medium for about 15 minutes. 
    3. Remove vegetables, and immediately add them to a prepared ice bath, making sure to cover them adequately.
    4. Drain cooking stock into a large mixing bowl or another large vessel, BUT DO NOT DISCARD. 
    5. Once vegetables have cooled, and ice has melted, remove vegetables from the ice bath (do not discard that water either).
    6. In a mortar, add boiled garlic and one additional clove of fresh garlic (not boiled) with 1/2 teaspoon salt. Using the pestle, grind garlic into a fine paste. 
    7. Seed all peppers and cut them into thin strips. Add to blender. Slice boiled onion and add to blender with cilantro. Add garlic paste and blend until smooth. (I needed to add just a bit of my stock water to thin out).  If there is room, begin to add tomatillos, and blend.  If not, blend tomatillos separately and then add to blended pepper mixture. 

    To make Curls:

    1. Add the ice water used to cool the pepper mixture to a sauté pan and add soy curls. Boil until curls have softened, about 5-8 minutes. Do not overcook. Drain soy curls. 
    2. Heat a dutch oven over medium heat and add oil. When the oil is warmed, add julienned onion and soy curls (you may need to do this in batches). Cook until onions and curls have browned. About 5-7 minutes.
    3. When browned, remove curl/onion mix from dutch oven and toss in 2 tablespoons of flour. (I wanted a gluten-free version, so I used brown rice flour). Set aside. 
    4. In the same pan, reduce heat  to medium and add the sauce from the blender. 
    5. Add 3 cups of reserved cooking stock, oregano, garlic powder, salt and pepper, and diced potatoes. 
    6. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat. Cook until potatoes have softened, about 20 minutes. 
    7. Add soy curls, and cook until warmed through and chile has thickened.  Taste for seasoning and serve. 
    8. Garnish with pickled red onion, fresh cilantro, and plain vegan yogurt. 
    9. Serve with very lightly fried corn tortillas. Enjoy! 

    Onion Soup Gratinée

    Onion Soup Gratinée

    This soup is not mine. I wish it were because it might be the best thing I’ve ever eaten. I had always loved French Onion soup. So it was no surprise when my friend took me to a French restaurant in Soho called Balthazar that I ordered their Onion Soup Gratinée. These were my pre-vegan days, of course, and for weeks afterward, I only dreamt of this soup. It was so unbelievably satisfying that I finally reached out to my friend Kate and asked her to get me the Balthazar cookbook. The day I got the book in the mail, I went to the store, bought a 3-pound bag of onions, and went to work.

    Now that I’m vegan, there were only a few small modifications to make. I am thrilled to say the flavor has not been altered at all. The trick is to make sure that the onions are deeply caramelized. Cooking the onions may take longer than expected, about 40 minutes. Be sure to keep the heat at medium and stir frequently. You do not want the onions to burn. The other key to this soup is the cheese. I used Miyoko’s Mozzarella cheese and grated it over the toasted sourdough bread.


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    Onion Soup Gratinée

    • Author: Stephanie Bosch

    Description

    A quote from the Balthazar’s cookbook…”Borrow a custom from Bordeaux and spill a little red wine into the bottom of your nearly empty soup bowl.  The tradition, down known as chabrot, dictates a quick swirl of wine into the tail-end of the hot broth and then a hearty gulp right from the bowl.” 


    Ingredients

    Scale
    • 1/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon olive oil
    • 4 medium yellow onions, peeled, halved through the stem end, and sliced 1/4 inch thick
    • 1 tablespoon unsalted vegan butter
    • 1 garlic clove, peeled and thinly sliced
    • 4 sprigs of thyme
    • 1 bay leaf
    • 1 tablespoon salt
    • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground white pepper
    • 3/4 cup dry white wine
    • 2 quarts vegetable stock
    • 1/2 cup port
    • 6 slices of sourdough bread, about 1 inch thick, toasted
    • 2 cups Miyoko’s vegan mozzarella, coarsely grated.

    Instructions

    In a 5-quart Dutch oven or other large, heavy pot, heat the olive oil over a medium flame. Add the onions and, stirring frequently to prevent burning, sauté until they reach a golden color, approximately 30 minutes.

    Add the butter, garlic, thyme, bay leaf, salt, and pepper and cook for 10 minutes. Raise the heat to high, add the white wine, bring to a boil, and reduce the wine by half, about 3 to 5 minutes.

    Add the vegetable stock and simmer for 45 minutes. Preheat the broiler. Remove the thyme springs and bay leaf, and swirl the port into the finished soup.

    Ladle the soup into the 6 ovenproof bowls.

    Fit the toasted bread into the bowls on top of the liquid, and sprinkle 1/3 cup of Mozzarella onto each slice. Place under the broiler for 3 minutes, or until the cheese melts to a crispy golden brown. Allow the soup to cool slightly, about 3 minutes, before serving.


    Spicy Shiitake Ramen with Crispy Tofu

    Spicy Shiitake Ramen with Crispy Tofu

    When I was in college, like most other kids my age, I lived on ramen noodles. And I’m talking about the $.25 per package ramen noodles. They were easy, cheap, and filled me up! It wasn’t until I lived with my vegetarian roommate Judy that I realized I could add things to my ramen and make it even better. I think I started by just adding scallions. Pretty soon, I added sautéed mushrooms and garlic. Eventually, my recipe became more and more complex. When I became a vegan, the beef became tofu, and the recipe had evolved again

    The best part of Ramen is that you can make it in an infinite number of ways. I like mine spicy, but if you don’t, you can leave out the gochujang, and it will be just fine! Gochujang is a Korean chili paste that may make dishes spicier (depending on the capsaicin in the base chili) and make dishes sweeter and smokier. Or if you like spicy but don’t want to buy something new you can use any hot sauce. You can add your favorite ingredients or whatever you happen to have on hand. There is no wrong way to make it. The key is a rich and flavorful broth. I hope you enjoy this recipe as much as I do!


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    Spicy Shiitake Ramen with Crispy Tofu

    • Author: Stephanie Bosch
    • Prep Time: 15
    • Cook Time: 30
    • Total Time: 45 minutes
    • Yield: 4 Servings 1x

    Description

    A delicious bowl of ramen is the ultimate comfort food.  And the best part is that you can make ramen an infinite number of ways!  This recipe happens to be my favorite, but you can use whatever ingredients you love or happen to have on hand.  Some additional toppings might include:

    • daikon radish
    • finely shredded cabbage
    • steamed bok choy
    • mushrooms (smoked are nice- see below!)
    • baby spinach
    • scallions

    Ingredients

    Scale
    • 12 to 16 ounces extra-firm tofu
    • 2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil, divided
    • 1 onion, sliced
    • 2 cloves garlic, minced
    • 2 tablespoons thin matchsticks peeled fresh ginger
    • 1 1/2 cups sliced shiitake mushroom caps (about 6 ounces)
    • 4 cups vegetable stock 
    • 1 sheet Kombu seaweed, rinsed
    • 1/8 cup mirin ( Japanese cooking wine)
    • 2 Tbsp Gochujang 
    • 2 tablespoons white miso paste
    • 1 tablespoon vegan soy sauce
    • 2 tablespoons water
    • pepper to taste
    • 4 heads baby bok choy, quartered lengthwise
    • 1 Fresno chile pepper, seeded and thinly sliced lengthwise
    • 12 ounces somen, udon or ramen noodles

    Instructions

    Make the Broth:

    1. In a dutch oven over medium-high heat, saute the onion in 1 tablespoon oil until tender about 3 minutes. Turn heat to medium, add the garlic and ginger and continue cooking the onions until they are deeply golden brown about 3 more minutes. Add the mushrooms to the pan; cook, stirring, until wilted, 1 to 2 minutes. Add the vegetable stock, a sheet of kombu, mirin, gochujang. Bring to a Simmer.

    Make Tofu: 

    1. Cut the tofu into bite-sized cubes. Warm a skillet over medium heat, when heated add 1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil. Add the tofu and cook for about 10 minutes until lightly browned and crisp on all sides, turning occasionally.
    2. Meanwhile, stir together 2 tablespoons miso, 1 tablespoon soy sauce and 1 tablespoon water. When the tofu is browned, turn off heat and carefully pour sauce over tofu (be careful, it splatters!). Stir sauce onto tofu and cook additional minute over medium heat until fragrant.

    Assemble:

    1. Add the bok choy and ramen noodles to dutch oven. Cover and cook, stirring halfway through, until the boy choy is wilted and the noodles are tender, about 4 minutes.  Add Tofu. 
    2. Top each bowl with chili.
    3. Serve Immediately. 

    Notes

    If you cannot find fresh shiitake mushrooms you can use dried.  Just be sure to chop or slice them into small pieces. 


    Nutrition

    • Calories: 400
    • Fat: 13.8
    • Saturated Fat: 1.8
    • Trans Fat: 0
    • Carbohydrates: 59.8

    Keywords: Vegan Ramen, Bok Choy, Shiitake

    Spicy Louisiana Style Jackfruit Gumbo

    Spicy Louisiana Style Jackfruit Gumbo

    I love all things, New Orleans. It is a city near and dear to my heart, and it is unlike any other place in the US. New Orleans has its own language (the YAT dialect), music (the birthplace of jazz), and its own food (Creole and Cajun). And when it comes to gumbo, the great debate in the Big Easy is Creole gumbo vs. Cajun gumbo! My favorite is both the Creole and the Cajun style. A typical Creole roux is made from butter and flour (as in France), while a Cajun roux is usually made with lard or oil and flour. This is partly due to the scarcity of dairy products in some areas of Acadiana (Acadia + Louisiana) when Cajun cuisine was being developed. 

    Creole and Cajun dishes are both built on the “holy trinity.” An aromatic base of sautéed bell peppers, onions, and celery, it is Louisiana’s version of mirepoix, or the mix of carrots, celery, and onion used in French cooking. The trinity was a result of the region’s strong French influence. Creole food, on the other hand, has its roots in Caribbean cuisine. Okra itself is an African ingredient incorporated into Creole dishes. Filé, or ground sassafras leaves, is a gumbo thickener, similar to cornstarch today, and comes from Native Americans. These have all become staples of Louisiana food and essential parts of the Louisiana cooking puzzle.

    I hope you love this recipe as much as I do!


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    Spicy Louisiana Style Jackfruit Gumbo

    • Author: Stephanie Bosch

    Description

    They key to a good roux is to cook it “low and slow.”  Keep the heat just south of medium heat and stir often.  A good gumbo roux will take anywhere from 8-10 minutes to make. You’re looking for a nice chocolate color. I like to serve this over rice with a huge slice of my cornbread! As is the case with most gumbos, this dish is best prepared either early in the day it is to be served, or even the day before, thereby allowing time for the flavors to marry. When reheating, stir often!


    Ingredients

    Scale
    • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil
    • 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
    • 1 medium onion, diced
    • 2 stalks celery, sliced
    • 1 green bell pepper, diced
    • 3 cloves garlic, miced
    • 1 can drained picked through green jackfruit
    • 1 pack vegan andouille sausage
    • 1 quart vegetable stock or broth
    • 1 16oz. can chopped tomatoes (I like San Marzano)
    • 1 tablespoon vegetarian Worcestershire sauce
    • 2 tablespoons Creole mustard
    • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
    • 2 teaspoons pickapeppa sauce
    • 1/2 teaspoons liquid smoke
    • 1/2 teaspoon hot sauce
    • 1 teaspoon soy sauce (liquid aminos)
    • 2 Tbsp Voodoo Magic Creole Spice Mix
    • 2 Tbsp Filé powder
    • 2 bay leaves
    • 4 cups sliced okra

    Instructions

    1. In a heavy bottomed skillet, heat 2 tablespoons of oil , add the okra and sauté over medium high heat for about 10 – 15 minutes or until all the “ropiness” is gone. This step may take a little longer if fresh okra is used. Frozen vegetables are usually plunged into boiling water and blanched before freezing, so they are partially cooked.  
    2. Place oil in a large (8 quart) heavy bottomed non-reactive Dutch oven type pot. Add the flour and, over a medium high fire, and make a dark brown roux. As soon as the proper color is achieved, add the onions, bell pepper, celery and garlic and saute, stirring occasionally until tender.
    3. During this process, allow the vegetables to stick to the bottom of the pan a bit, then scrape the bottom with a metal spoon or spatula. This allows some of the natural sugars in the onions to caramelize, rendering great depth of flavor.
    4. Stir in jackfruit and sausage, and sauté for about 5 minutes, until the veggies begin to soften.
    5. Stir in the broth, tomatoes, okra, Worcestershire, Creole mustard, pickapeppa sauce, liquid smoke, apple cider vinegar, hot sauce, and soy sauce.
    6. Add Voodoo Spice Mix, bay leaves, and filé. Raise the heat and bring to a boil. Lower the heat and allow to simmer, stirring occasionally, until the broth is thick and the veggies are tender, about 30 minutes.
    7. Remove bay leaves. Taste for seasonings.
    8. Serve over rice, and enjoy!  

    Vegan Clam Chowder

    Vegan Clam Chowder

    Years ago, I was fortunate enough to spend some time in Newport, Rhode Island. I  loved it there and can’t wait to go back someday.  As a foodie, of course, my first mission was to find the very best clam chowder I could find. So every restaurant I went to, I ordered their clam chowder.  The winner was from a restaurant called the Black Pearl. Their version had a perfect balance of creaminess, texture, and flavor that I’ve never forgotten. 

    Now that I am a vegan, of course, I refrain from seafood. But my love for clam chowder has never faded! And I don’t think I’m the only one!  The most downloaded recipe on my blog with nearly 7,000 views is my vegan lobster bisque recipe made with lobster mushrooms! So it occurred to me that maybe it was time to try my hand at a vegan version of clam chowder.

    My recipe is made using oyster mushrooms instead of clams and seasoned with dulse flakes and a delicious vegan fysh sauce. I promise you’ll be in bisque heaven! 


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    Vegan Clam Chowder

    • Author: Stephanie Bosch
    • Prep Time: 15
    • Cook Time: 20
    • Total Time: 35 minutes
    • Yield: 4 cups 1x

    Ingredients

    Scale
    • 1 yellow onion, diced
    • 2 stalks celery, diced
    • 2 cloves garlic minced ( or 1 tsp garlic powder)
    • 6 oz oyster mushrooms, small dice 
    • 3 small russet potatoes, small dice
    • 10 sprigs fresh thyme, thyme sprigs leaves removed
    • 1/2 cup dry white wine
    • 4 cups veggie stock 
    • 2 Tbsp Fysh sauce
    • 2 Tbsp dulse flakes
    • 1 tsp garlic powder
    • 1 tsp salt
    • 1 tsp pepper
    • 1 tsp dill weed

      Cashew Cream 

      • 1 cup raw cashews
      • 1 tsp garlic powder
      • 1 tsp onion powder
      • 1 tsp sea salt
      • dash white pepper
      • 1 cup water

        Instructions

        Make Cashew Cream—Add cashews, garlic powder, onion powder, salt, white pepper, and 1 cup water to a high speed blender, blend until smooth.  Set aside. 
         
        Warm dutch oven over medium heat.  Add 2 Tbsp vegetable stock, onions and celery.  Sauté until onions become translucent, about 7-8 minutes.  Add garlic and sauté until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Season with 1 tsp salt.  
         
        Add mushrooms and thyme. Sauté on medium heat for 6-8 minutes, adding additional vegetable stock 1 tbsp at a time if vegetables begin to stick. Deglaze pan with white wine.  Simmer for 1-2 minutes, or until wine is absorbed.  
         
        Add potatoes, vegetable stock, fysh sauce, dulse flakes, garlic powder, and salt and pepper.  Bring ingredients to a boil.  Cover and reduce heat to low and simmer for 15-20 minutes, or until potatoes are softened.  
         
        When potatoes are done, add cashew cream sauce and dill weed.  Stir well.  Taste for seasonings.  Add additional salt and pepper as needed.
         
        Serve with croutons or oyster crackers.  

         

        ENJOY! 

         
         


        Nutrition

        • Serving Size: 1 1/2 cups
        • Calories: 531
        • Sodium: 96g
        • Fat: 16.2
        • Saturated Fat: 3.2
        • Carbohydrates: 71.3
        • Protein: 22g
        • Cholesterol: 0

        Kombu Veggie Stock

        LG’s Smoky Beer Cheese Soup

        LG’s Smoky Beer Cheese Soup

        I’ll be honest. I love cheese. It was, in fact, the most challenging thing for me to give up as a vegan. As a result, I even created and taught a class around the art of vegan cheese making. Years ago, when I first went plant-based, the vegan cheeses at the store always fell flat. The texture was off, and the taste was subpar, at best. Fast forward to now, my friends. I am so happy to say that Daiya has come up with a Farmhouse Style block cheese that is extremely good and quite impressive!

        I serve in on my charcuterie boards, and many of my non-vegan friends are amazed at how delicious it is! It looks like cheddar, feels like cheddar, and tastes like cheddar! That said, I had never really used it in a recipe until now! It was everything I’d hoped it would be! It melts exceptionally well and adds a rich depth of creamy goodness! Very pleased, and I think you will be, too! This soup is for you, Lisa G. I hope you like it!


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        LG’s Smoky Beer Cheese Soup

        • Author: Stephanie Bosch
        • Prep Time: 10
        • Cook Time: 20
        • Total Time: 30 minutes
        • Yield: 6 cups 1x
        • Cuisine: Soup
        • Diet: Vegan

        Description

        Delicious smoky cheddar beer soup!  Serve it in a bread boule, and voila, you are in cheese heaven!  


        Ingredients

        Scale
        • 2 celery ribs, finely chopped
        • 2 carrots, finely chopped
        • 2 medium shallots, finely chopped
        • 1 large jalapeño, seeded and chopped
        • 2 large garlic cloves, minced
        • ⅛ tsp liquid smoke
        • One 12-ounce bottle lager or pilsner
        • About 2 1/4 cups low-sodium vegetable broth
        • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
        • 1 cup plant-based milk
        • 1 package of Daiya Cheddar Farmhouse Style block, coarsely grated
        • Salt and freshly ground pepper
        • Bread Boule, for serving

        Instructions

        In a dutch oven, bring ¼ cup veggie stock to a simmer over medium heat. Add celery, carrots, shallots, and jalapeno, cook until tender, about 7 minutes.  Add more stock 1 tbsp at a time, as needed, to prevent sticking.   To the dutch oven add the flour and cook over moderate heat, stirring, until lightly browned about 2 minutes. Whisk ½ the beer and all the stock into this roux until incorporated and bring to a simmer. Cook until thickened, about 8 minutes. Add the milk, and cheddar cheese, and the remaining beer and simmer, stirring occasionally, until thick and creamy, about 5 minutes. Blend with an immersion blender, or blend half of the soup in the blender, then add the remaining soup, and blend until smooth.   Stir in the liquid smoke and season with salt and pepper. Add a few tablespoons of broth if the soup is too thick. Serve the soup with french bread!


        Notes

        I used a Belgian style farmhouse ale, and it was delicious! You can use Daiya’s Farmhouse Jalapeño Havarti, or their Smoked Gouda, for this recipe as well.


        Nutrition

        • Serving Size: 1 cup
        • Calories: 300
        • Fat: 14
        • Saturated Fat: 2
        • Carbohydrates: 31
        • Fiber: 5g
        • Protein: 13