Invictus

Invictus

When I was a kid, we moved around a lot. And I mean, a lot. For instance, when I was in the 5th grade, I went to 2 different schools in one week. I won’t go into all the reasons why we moved. But between mom’s restless nature and money issues, I lived in a total of 18 different houses until I left for college. No joke. Every time I started to establish firm roots, I was plucked up and planted someplace else. Sometimes I was lucky enough to be in the same school district. Other times, I was not. And like flowers in a garden, you either learn to adapt and become so strong that nothing can kill you or you wilt and die.

So it’s not hard to imagine there were some real gaps in my education. I was a good student and usually enjoyed school. But I always felt like I was either behind or ahead of everyone else and mostly kept to myself. I left home at sixteen when they decided to move again and lived with friends until I graduated a semester early. Looking back now, I’m surprised that I did as well as I did. I also realized moving around a lot was an education in and of itself. Making me more flexible and resourceful, I learned to assimilate into any new situation quickly, how to ask for help when I needed it, and grew to be so damn determined to be the master of my fate and the captain of my soul.

Little did I know that one day, because of a global pandemic, I would homeschool my kids, and many of those gaps would begin to fill in. One of the best things about being my kid’s teacher is that I can take my time and stick with a topic until they have fully assimilated it, which is critical for my son, who has high functioning autism. While his IQ is somewhere north of 130, he struggles with learning new material, which makes school a problem for kids like him since they are allowed only so much time to learn the material. In elementary school, his grades were not excellent, but not bad. They were also not predictive whatsoever of his actual intelligence. They say that gifted kids also have a learning disability. So while he could memorize a 32-page book word for word, he couldn’t tell you the context of the story or its meaning.

As with a lot of spectrum kids, reading comprehension is a significant issue for him. And it remained his biggest issue until he got to middle school, where things changed for the worse. You see, the other critical components of Aspergers kids are that they struggle with peer assimilation and social cueing. For example, something that you or I may just “pick up on” won’t even register with him. So he often speaks out of turn and talks about subjects that seem random and out of place. To him, what he’s saying makes perfect sense, but to others, not so much.

Unfortunately, this cognitive deficit led to relentlessly bullying, which often left him in tears. He ate lunch alone and developed a strategy for choosing which corridors to walk down to avoid his tormenters. His teachers saw him withdraw, and his grades began to plummet. Never one to run from problems, I decided to hire a private tutor, set him up with a private counselor, had a girl removed from two of his classes, and sought a resolution with the other bullies from the school counselor and the 6th-grade principal. Just as things seemed to turn the corner, covid hit. And when I became his teacher, the real heartbreak set in when I realized just how far behind he was. So I put everything else aside and took on the role of a full-time teacher.

It goes without saying that when you are a teacher, you have to know the material before you can teach it.  So for weeks before starting school and every night afterward, I became a student again.  In some subjects, I am re-learning material that I’d forgotten.  But in other subjects, I am learning things I never knew.  And I have to say it’s pretty cool.  I certainly appreciate the knowledge that I’m gleaning, way more than I did when I was a kid. I also kept my youngest child at home too.  She is just the opposite of her brother.  A social butterfly, often bored in school because she isn’t being challenged enough. 

And I am teaching them so much more than math and reading, science, or social studies.  I’m teaching them to think critically and not believe everything they see, read, or hear.   I am teaching them that the victors write the history books, but there is always more to the story.  We are learning about poets, artists, and activists.  We take field trips to the art museum and hike through the woods.   Cooking is science class, and math is everywhere we look. 

When he was young, a school counselor told me that my son had a limited learning capacity and would likely never go to college. I am proud to say that he is catching up, and not only is he doing well, he is flourishing. He will begin taking dual credit college courses in two years and will graduate from high school with an associates degree. But most importantly, he’s happy and knows that by putting in the hard work, he can learn. He also knows that no matter how hard it is, and no matter how bad it gets, life can always get better. My 2nd grader is doing 3rd-grade work now and has taken over, reading to me every night. I’m pretty sure that if I’ve ever had a life’s purpose, I’ve found it in teaching my kids.

And in case you don’t know Invictus, here it is.

Out of the night that covers me,
      Black as the pit from pole to pole,
I thank whatever gods may be
      For my unconquerable soul.

In the fell clutch of circumstance
      I have not winced nor cried aloud.
Under the bludgeonings of chance
      My head is bloody, but unbowed.

Beyond this place of wrath and tears
      Looms but the Horror of the shade,
And yet the menace of the years
      Finds and shall find me unafraid.

It matters not how strait the gate,
      How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate,
      I am the captain of my soul.

— William Ernest Henley

Voodoo Magic Creole Spice Mix

Voodoo Magic Creole Spice Mix

The end all be all of the spice mixes! I use this in so many recipes that I get in a panic when I start to run dry! It keeps well in an air tight container for up to six months. I use it in my gumbo, red beans and rice, jambalaya, and my black-eyed pea recipes! When I use this mix, it replaces the salt in all my recipes.  


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Voodoo Magic Creole Spice Mix

  • Author: Stephanie Bosch

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Ingredients

  1. 3 tablespoons paprika
  2. 2 tablespoons onion powder
  3. 2 tablespoons garlic powder
  4. 2 tablespoons dried oregano
  5. 1 tablespoon smoked paprika
  6. 1 tablespoon dried basil
  7. 1 tablespoon dried thyme
  8. 1 tablespoon black pepper
  9. 1 tablespoon white pepper
  10. 1 tablespoon cayenne pepper
  11. *3 tablespoon kosher salt (optional)
 
 

Instructions

 

Whisk all ingredients together in a small bowl. Store in a mason jar for up to 6 months.


Creole Smoky Black-Eyed Peas

Creole Smoky Black-Eyed Peas

Growing up in a southern family, eating black-eyed peas was a part of every Sunday meal at our house. I don’t quite remember, but I think Grandma just opened a can of beans, threw in a ham bone, and called it dinner! My recipe has evolved over the years, and this one is my favorite! This vegan version pays homage to my New Orleans side of the family, and its creole influence lends a rich, creamy, and super smoky deliciousness!

Though called a pea, black-eyed peas are a variety of the cowpea and are technically a bean. In the South, this dish is referred to as Hoppin’ John, and while a traditional Hoppin’ John is made with bacon, a ham hock, or fatback, this vegan version uses liquid smoke.

It is customary to make black-eyed peas on New Year’s Day for good luck and prosperity for the New Year in southern culture. Served with greens (collards, mustard, or turnip greens, which vary regionally), the peas represent coins, the greens represent paper money. Cornbread is often served with black-eyed peas and greens, represents gold.

Serve over rice, with a piece of cornbread, and enjoy! Oh, and don’t forget the hot sauce!


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Creole Smoky Black-Eyed Peas

  • Author: Stephanie Bosch
  • Prep Time: 2 hours
  • Cook Time: 25 minutes
  • Total Time: 2 hours 25 minutes
  • Yield: 6 servings 1x

Description

I like to use dried beans because most canned black-eyed peas are simmered in a ham broth. Or they contain Disodium EDTA, which is a preservative used to promote color retention. It is synthesized from ethylenediamine, formaldehyde, and sodium cyanide. EEK! But you can use canned beans in a pinch, or if you don’t want to wait! When I used canned beans of any kind, I like to use the Eden Organic brand.


Scale

Ingredients

  • 4 cups dry black-eyed peas
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 large onion, diced
  • 1 red bell pepper, diced
  • 2 ribs celery, minced
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1  jalapeno pepper, minced
  • 2 (15-ounce) can fire roasted tomatoes 
  • 5 cups vegetable stock 
  • 3 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 1 tbsp voodoo magic spice mix*
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/8 tsp liquid smoke
  • 1 bay leaf
  • Freshly ground black pepper (to taste)
  • Tabasco, parsley, and green onions, for garnish

Instructions


    • Rinse dried black-eyed pea beans, pick through and discard any debris or bad beans. Add beans to a stockpot and bring to a boil. Boil for 5 minutes and remove from heat. Cover and let sit for 1-2 hours.
    • Warm a large, heavy skillet (I use cast iron), add 2 tbsp oil. When the oil is shimmering, add onions, bell pepper, celery, garlic, and jalapeños, sauté the mixture for 3-5 minutes. Add voodoo seasoning mix. Sauté until mixture has softened, about 3 minutes. 
    • Add vegetable stock, tomatoes, tomato paste, and bay leaf.
    • Drain the soaked beans, rinse, and add the beans to the pot. 
    • Reduce heat to a simmer and cook, uncovered, for about 20 minutes.
    • At this point, if using, add collard greens, and cook for 5 more minutes, stirring occasionally,
    • Cook until beans are tender and slightly thickened.
    • Add more stock or water if the mixture becomes dry and thick. The texture of the beans should be thick, somewhat creamy but not watery.
    • Remove the bay leaves.
    • Taste and adjust for seasonings with pepper, seasoning, and salt if needed. Serve over cooked rice and garnish with green onion.
    • Add lots of Tabasco and enjoy it! 


Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 6
  • Calories: 210

Herbed Vegan Goat Cheese

Herbed Vegan Goat Cheese

I adore Julie Piatt, aka Sri Mati. She is the author of “This Cheese is Nuts” and is also what you might call my spiritual mentor. She is a peace-loving hippie momma and a vegan. And she has created the best vegan version of goat cheese or chèvre that I’ve ever had. I make this recipe at least 2-3 days before I want to use it. I think the longer it has to sit and ferment, the better.


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Julie Piatt’s Macadamia Nut Herbed Goat Cheese

  • Author: Stephanie Bosch

Description

If you don’t have a dehydrator, don’t fret. You can use your oven on the lowest setting (mine is 150°) and bake for 1 hour.  Because I make a lot of vegan cheeses I always keep acidophilus caps in the fridge.  Also, I think it goes without saying that you do have to open the capsules before using, but I’ll say it anyway!  


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Ingredients

  • 2 cups raw macadamia nuts
  • 1 capsule acidophilus (3-billion active-cultures strain)
  • 1/2 tsp. + 1/8 tsp Celtic sea salt 
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened coconut milk
  • 2 tsp refined coconut oil (make SURE it says “refined”)
  • 1 tsp Himalayan sea salt
  • 2 Tbsp za’atar, or other herb combo such as thyme, oregano, marjoram

Instructions

  1. Add everything but the za’atar to blender.  Blend on medium speed until smooth.  Depending on your mixer this could take anywhere from 45 seconds to 3-4 minutes.  
  2. Transfer mixture to the center of cheese cloth.  Gather the edges and tie off each end with string.  Place in dehydrator and dehydrate at 90° for 24 hours.  If you do not have a dehydrator you can achieve something similar in a low oven at 170° for one hour.  
  3. Once aging is complete remove cheese from the cloth  including the rind, and add to stand mixer. Mix until light and fluffy.  
  4. Adjust seasonings to taste.  She recommends adding the remaining 1/8 tsp, if too mild.
  5. Turn cheese out onto clean workspace and divide in half.  Roll 1/2 of the cheese inside wax paper until it forms a nice even log.  Repeat with the other half. 
  6. After the logs have set roll in herb mixture and refrigerate for at least 2 hours.  
  7. Serve

 


Stuffed Acorn Squash

Stuffed Acorn Squash

Thanksgiving is one of my favorite holidays. Mostly because I get to see family, eat until my heart’s content, and then lay around like a slug watching football until it’s time to go to bed. But being a vegan means I always have to bring my own food! Every year I tell myself I’m going to make something different, and every year I come back to this same recipe! I LOVE this dish for Thanksgiving. It is not only delicious, but it’s also a show stopper! Mark Twain once said, “I can live for two months on a good compliment.” And I get enough compliments on this dish to last me until Valentine’s Day!

The basmati mixed with the sweet cranberries and spicy vegan sausage is simply delicious! If you don’t want to use the Field Roast Farms sausage, you can use Crimini mushrooms instead. The vegan goat cheese is super simple to make, and I usually double the batch. I use half the cheese for this recipe (I also use it in my Mushroom Wellington recipe). And I use the other half of the cheese rolled in herbs as my holiday appetizer. You will need to make the cheese a day in advance. But if you don’t want to make your cheese, Miyoko Schinner makes a Classic Chive Double Cream Cheese that is divine and you could easily substitute.


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Stuffed Acorn Squash

  • Author: Stephanie Bosch
  • Prep Time: 15
  • Cook Time: 45
  • Total Time: 1 hour

Description

Usually, I avoid using vegan “meats” from the grocery store. Typically they are highly processed and contain ingredients that I can’t pronounce. But this Field Roast Farms sausage is made 100% from fresh fruit and vegetables! Crafted from apples, Yukon gold potatoes, onions, garlic, sage, and ginger, it is the perfect “meat” for my vegan meal!  If you wish to avoid the sausage, you can easily use diced crimini mushrooms instead!  Do be aware this sausage is not gluten free. 


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Ingredients

For the roasted acorn squash:

  • 2 large acorn squash
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • Pinch of salt and black pepper
  • Pinch of thyme

For the filling:

  • 1 tablespoons olive oil (can use vegetable stock, if oil free)
  • 2 Field Roast Smoked Apple & Sage Sausage links, cases removed and diced
  • 1 large yellow onion, diced 
  • 1 1/2 tsp garlic (about 3 cloves)
  • 1 1/2 cup prepared rice (I used white basmati)
  • 1 tsp dried thyme 
  • 1 tsp oregano
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 1 tsp dried parsley
  • 1 cup herbed vegan goat cheese
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • Pinch of black pepper
  • ½ cup fresh parsley, chopped (plus more for garnish)
  • ½ cup dried cranberries
  • 1/2 cup vegan parmesan (I use Follow Your Heart)

 


Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 425° degrees. Wash and dry squash. Slice squash in half from tip to stem and scoop out seeds.
  2. Place the squash halves flesh side up on a baking sheet. Drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with salt, pepper, and pinch of thyme. Roast flesh side down until almost done, about 25-30 minutes. Remove squash from oven and set aside.
  3. While squash is cooking heat medium size skillet over medium heat.  Add 1 tablespoon of olive oil (or stock, if oil free) to pan.  Once the oil begins to shimmer add diced onion, sausage, and dried cranberries. Add 1 tsp each thyme, oregano, garlic powder, and parsley. Sauté until onions are translucent and sausage has browned about 6-7 minutes. Add garlic and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds. 
  4. Add prepared rice.  Stir until rice is warmed through.
  5. Remove the skillet from heat and stir in the vegan goat cheese. Season with salt and black pepper. 
  6. When done, remove squash from oven and reduce heat to 350°.  
  7. Divide mixture between squash halves.  Top each squash with vegan parmesan cheese and return to oven.  Bake for an additional 30 minutes.  
  8. Garnish with fresh parsley. Serve warm.

Notes

The sausage mixture can be made a day ahead and refrigerated.   

Southern Style Collard Green’s

Southern Style Collard Green’s

When I was a kid, I hated eating my greens. The only green things I would eat were canned peas and canned green beans. Kale wasn’t a thing, and I would have rather died than eat Brussels sprouts. I refused to eat broccoli or spinach and never even considered eating collard greens. My mom would make spinach out of a can, and I clearly remember gagging it down. But as it happens with many of us, when I got older, my green food repertoire grew as I grew, and now I can’t get enough of them! These collards are no exception! I crave them sometimes with a big old piece of cornbread and a glass of wine!

For a true southern style meal, these collards pair very well with black eyed peas and cornbread! I love the heat of the red pepper flakes and the smokiness of the paprika. They also pair extremely well with a nice Sauvignon Blanc! Enjoy!


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Southern Style Collard Green’s

  • Author: Stephanie Bosch

Description

Collards are cruciferous vegetables like broccoli, brussels sprouts, kale, and cabbage. They are also very nutrient dense! They are high in fiber, iron, calcium, and manganese! 


Scale

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 onion, thinly sliced
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 15-oz can of diced fire-roasted tomatoes
  • 2 large bunches of collard greens, stems removed, and leaves very thinly sliced (removing the stems is optional)
  • 2 cups vegetable stock
  • 1 tsp red pepper flakes (optional, but recommended)
  • Sea salt
  • 2 tablespoons liquid aminos
  • 2 teaspoon smoked paprika + more to taste

Instructions

  1. Warm oil in a dutch oven over medium heat.
  2. Sauté onion until translucent, about 7-8 minutes. Add the garlic, and sauté for about 30 seconds or until fragrant.
  3. Stir in the tomatoes, and simmer for about 3 minutes. 
  4. Add the chopped collard greens, 1/2 tsp sea salt, vegetable stock, and red pepper flakes, stir well. Reduce heat to low, and cover. Cook until tender, about 25-30 minutes.
  5. Remove from heat, stir in the liquid aminos and smoked paprika. Season to taste.

Notes

*If you don’t have smoked paprika you can also use 1/8 tsp of liquid smoke. 

World’s Best Cornbread

World’s Best Cornbread

I love cornbread! I loved my Grandma’s cornbread most of all. But her recipe contained eggs, buttermilk, and wheat flour. I tell ya, being gluten-free and vegan is no easy task! There are so many obstacles to overcome that you either feel like giving up or just settling for the substandard pre-made crap you can find in the grocery store. So with Grandma’s cornbread out of the question. I sat out on the arduous journey of creating my recipe. As many of you gluten-free folks may know, gluten-free can mean dry, chalky, and dense. And on the vegan side of things, no eggs and no buttermilk can mean your bread falls completely apart, or it merely refuses to rise! So, what is a girl to do? After making some delicious banana muffins and using aquafaba in my chocolate chip cookies, I decided to combine the two and make cornbread! The result was the BEST cornbread ever. Sorry, Grandma.

Anyway, this recipe pairs well with my Gumbo, Chili, Black-Eyed Peas with Collard Greens, and it hangs well just by itself! I love to add diced jalapeños to mine! Just be sure to let it cool for at least 5-10 minutes! I hope you enjoy it!


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World’s Best Cornbread

  • Author: Stephanie Bosch
  • Prep Time: 5
  • Cook Time: 25-35
  • Total Time: 11 minute

Description

This unbelievable GF vegan cornbread uses aquafaba in place of eggs and Bob’s Red Mill GF flour blend! Simply amazing! The key to this recipe is also using fine grind cornmeal like this one. 


Scale

Ingredients


Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (176 C) and lightly grease a standard 9-inch round cake pan or 8×8-inch baking dish and dust with gluten-free flour. Shake out excess and set aside. (I also think you could use an 9-inch cast iron skillet, but it wouldn’t come out as easily and will likely have to be served directly from the pan).
  • In a liquid measuring cup, measure out non-dairy milk and add vinegar or lemon juice. Set aside.
  • Add chickpea brine to a medium-mixing bowl and begin whipping until loose peaks form. Then add sugar in a little at a time and beat until the texture is glossy and white and semi-firm peaks form.
  • Add dry ingredients to a large mixing bowl and whisk to combine. Then add non-dairy milk mixture and oil and whisk once more. Finally, add the whipped chickpea brine (with sugar) and gently whisk/fold in until a thick but pourable batter is formed.
  • The batter should be thick but pourable. Add more cornmeal or gluten-free flour if too wet or non-dairy milk if too thick. 
  • Add batter to prepared cake pan and bake on a center rack for 25-35 minutes, or until the edges are light golden brown and a toothpick inserted into the center comes out completely clean.
  • Let cool completely in the pan – set on a wire rack to speed cooling process. To remove, run a dull knife around the edge of the cake pan to loosen, then slice and serve. Alternatively, place a plate on top and quickly invert. It will be upside down so flip onto another serving platter to get it right side up.

Notes

*Any good GF flour blend will work.  Just make sure that it contains xanthin gum (used as a substitute for wheat gluten) as it is a binder for GF flour. 

Keywords: Vegan, Gluten-Free, Cornbread

Vegan Queso Blanco

Vegan Queso Blanco

Sweet dreams are made of cheese! I think I’ve mentioned this a few times, but the most challenging part of being a vegan was giving up the cheese. I even went so far as to create and teach a vegan cheese class! I adore this vegan Queso Blanco! It is so yummy and so easy to make. I put it on everything from my enchiladas to making a delicious mac-n-cheese. Mostly, I stand around with a plate of warm tortilla chips and dip until my heart’s content! I hope you love it as much as I do!

The other great thing about this recipe is that it is cholesterol-free, yep 100% plant-based, and no oil! Serve this dip piping hot, and don’t be surprised when it disappears quickly! Easy to re-heat with just a tablespoon or two plant-based milk and microwave on medium heat for 30 seconds. Stir, and add 30 seconds as needed until warm!

Vegan Queso Blanco

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Vegan Queso Blanco

  • Author: Stephanie Bosch
  • Prep Time: 10
  • Cook Time: 5
  • Total Time: 20 minutes
  • Yield: 4 cups 1x
  • Category: Vegan Cheese
  • Diet: Vegan

Description

This oil-free vegan queso is ready in less than 15 minutes! So yummy, you can add as much or as little heat as you want by skipping the jalapeños or doubling them up! Enjoy!

 


Scale

Ingredients

  • 1 cup raw cashews, soaked overnight, if not using high powered blender
  • 1 onion, diced
  • 2 garlic cloves, peeled
  • 1 cup vegetable stock
  • 1 cup plant-based milk (I use Oatly oat milk)
  • 3 tbsp nutritional yeast
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 1 tsp tapioca starch (for a gooey consistency)
  • 12 tsp salt
  • 1 (4 oz) can pickled jalapeños with juice
  • 1 can tomatoes with green chili’s, like Rotel
  • Dash turmeric for color, if desired

Instructions

  1. Warm a medium-size skillet over medium heat. Add 2 tbsp vegetable stock and onions. Sauté onions until done and translucent, about 7-8 minutes. Remove onions from pan, and add to blender. Add all remaining ingredients except the Rotel tomatoes, if using. Blend until very smooth. If using a Vitamix, about 45 seconds on high.
  2. Transfer to a saucepan and put on the stove over medium-low heat. Heat until desired consistency, continually stirring so as not to burn the bottom. 
  3. Taste and add extra salt if desired. Pour vegan queso into a serving bowl and stir in the 1/4 cup chopped pickled jalapeños and drained can of Rotel if using. Garnish and serve.
  4.  

Notes

Keep leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge about 5 days. When reheating, add additional unsweetened plant-based milk, if desired, to thin to desired consistency.

You can use chicken broth instead of vegetable if you’re not vegan.

I use a Vitamix and love it.


Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 12
  • Calories: 101
  • Fat: 7g
  • Protein: 3g

Keywords: Vegan Queso Blanco

Cousin Sara’s Savory Vegetable Pot Pie

Cousin Sara’s Savory Vegetable Pot Pie

My cousin Sara and her husband are expecting their first baby! They have both recently dabbled in a vegan/vegetarian lifestyle and said they felt really great! Because they want to continue their journey Sara reached out for some recipes. We talked about how our western plates are the exact same, a meat, a vegetable, and starch. So, what does one do when the meat is not on the plate? We make our veggies come front and center! I hope you love this Sara! Love to all three of you! Can’t wait to see the new bundle!

This, my friends, is the ultimate comfort food. I simply love a good pot pie, and let me tell you this one doesn’t disappoint. The key for me in the one is the pickapeppa sauce. If you’ve never heard of it before it is made from cane vinegar, onions, sugar, tomato paste, sea salt, peppers, raisins, ginger, mango concentrate, cloves, thyme, garlic, black pepper, orange peel. It’s rich and adds a depth of flavor I’ve never seen before. Subsequently, I use it in my vegan gumbo, and it is a game-changer!

The other great thing about a veggie pot pie is that you can use any vegetables that you have on hand! I loved the addition of green beans and parsnips in this recipe! You can make the filling in advance and/or double the filling and freeze the half you don’t use! I also prefer to use fresh herbs if possible!

Vegetable Pot Pie

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Savory Vegetable Pot Pie

  • Author: Stephanie Bosch
  • Prep Time: 20
  • Cook Time: 25
  • Total Time: 45 minutes
  • Yield: 6 servings 1x

Description

Savory vegan vegetable pot pie!  Loaded with veggies, this is the ultimate comfort food! 


Scale

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons vegetable stock
  • 1 onion, chopped 
  • 8 ounces crimini mushrooms, stemmed and quartered
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 2 large carrots, diced 
  • 2 parsnips, diced
  • 2 medium russet potatoes, peeled and diced
  • 2 stalks celery, sliced 1/4 inch wide
  • 1 cup fresh green beans, trimmed and snapped into 1/2 inch pieces
  • 3 cups vegetable broth
  • 1 cup plant-based milk
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon dry rubbed sage
  • 1 teaspoon oregano
  • 1 teaspoon rosemary
  • 1 teaspoon thyme
  • Pinch cayenne pepper (optional)
  • 1 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon pickapeppa sauce (do not omit)
  • 1 pre-made piecrust

Wash:

2 tablespoons coconut oil and 1 tablespoon maple syrup, mixed


Instructions

Preheat oven to 425°.  

Heat vegetable stock over medium heat in a large cast-iron skillet. Cook onions, mushrooms, and garlic in stock for 3 to 5 minutes stirring frequently. Stir in carrots, parsnips, potatoes, and celery.  If the vegetables begin to stick, add additional stock one tablespoon at a time if needed.  

Add spices and cook for 2 minutes. Stir in green beans. Sprinkle the flour over the top of the vegetables and cook 2 minutes, until the white disappears (the vegetables will seem dry). Slowly pour in the milk, adding a few splashes at a time, stirring constantly, scraping any brown bits from the bottom of the pan.  Add vegetable stock, soy sauce, and pickapeppa sauce. Bring to a low boil.

Continue to let bubble until thickened, about 3 to 5 minutes, stirring very often and scraping a spatula along the bottom of the pot to prevent sticking. Then turn the heat down and simmer for about 10 minutes, or until vegetables are barely tender.  Season with salt and pepper.  Remove from heat and let cool for about 5 minutes. 

Roll the pie dough into a circle large enough to cover your cast iron pan. Brush the edges of the cast iron with the coconut oil and maple syrup wash, then lay the dough over the top to overhang the sides. Trim the overhang to a 1/2 inch larger than the edge of the pan. Gently press the dough onto the sides of the pan so that it sticks, then brush all over with the remaining wash. With a sharp knife, cut five slits in the top.
Carefully place the cast iron in the oven. Bake until the pie is hot and bubbly on the inside, and the crust is deeply golden, about 20 to 25 minutes, rotating the pan 180 degrees F halfway through. Let rest a few minutes. Serve hot.



Nutrition

  • Calories: 467

LG’s Smoky Beer Cheese Soup

LG’s Smoky Beer Cheese Soup

I’ll be honest. I love cheese. It was, in fact, the most challenging thing for me to give up as a vegan. As a result, I even created and taught a class around the art of vegan cheese making. Years ago, when I first went plant-based, the vegan cheeses at the store always fell flat. The texture was off, and the taste was subpar, at best. Fast forward to now, my friends. I am so happy to say that Daiya has come up with a Farmhouse Style block cheese that is extremely good and quite impressive!

I serve in on my charcuterie boards, and many of my non-vegan friends are amazed at how delicious it is! It looks like cheddar, feels like cheddar, and tastes like cheddar! That said, I had never really used it in a recipe until now! It was everything I’d hoped it would be! It melts exceptionally well and adds a rich depth of creamy goodness! Very pleased, and I think you will be, too! This soup is for you, Lisa G. I hope you like it!


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LG’s Smoky Beer Cheese Soup

  • Author: Stephanie Bosch
  • Prep Time: 10
  • Cook Time: 20
  • Total Time: 30 minutes
  • Yield: 6 cups 1x
  • Cuisine: Soup
  • Diet: Vegan

Description

Delicious smoky cheddar beer soup!  Serve it in a bread boule, and voila, you are in cheese heaven!  


Scale

Ingredients

  • 2 celery ribs, finely chopped
  • 2 carrots, finely chopped
  • 2 medium shallots, finely chopped
  • 1 large jalapeño, seeded and chopped
  • 2 large garlic cloves, minced
  • ⅛ tsp liquid smoke
  • One 12-ounce bottle lager or pilsner
  • About 2 1/4 cups low-sodium vegetable broth
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup plant-based milk
  • 1 package of Daiya Cheddar Farmhouse Style block, coarsely grated
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • Bread Boule, for serving

Instructions

In a dutch oven, bring ¼ cup veggie stock to a simmer over medium heat. Add celery, carrots, shallots, and jalapeno, cook until tender, about 7 minutes.  Add more stock 1 tbsp at a time, as needed, to prevent sticking.   To the dutch oven add the flour and cook over moderate heat, stirring, until lightly browned about 2 minutes. Whisk ½ the beer and all the stock into this roux until incorporated and bring to a simmer. Cook until thickened, about 8 minutes. Add the milk, and cheddar cheese, and the remaining beer and simmer, stirring occasionally, until thick and creamy, about 5 minutes. Blend with an immersion blender, or blend half of the soup in the blender, then add the remaining soup, and blend until smooth.   Stir in the liquid smoke and season with salt and pepper. Add a few tablespoons of broth if the soup is too thick. Serve the soup with french bread!


Notes

I used a Belgian style farmhouse ale, and it was delicious! You can use Daiya’s Farmhouse Jalapeño Havarti, or their Smoked Gouda, for this recipe as well.


Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1 cup
  • Calories: 300
  • Fat: 14
  • Saturated Fat: 2
  • Carbohydrates: 31
  • Fiber: 5g
  • Protein: 13