Tahini Free Roasted Garlic Hummus

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Adapted from The Wholesome Dish

I love hummus, and my husband has crowned himself the king of hummus.  He makes it all the time.   And his hummus is forever changing.  It’s usually a product of his current culinary whims. Sometimes he adds fresh dill from our garden. Sometimes he adds a nice smoked paprika that we found at our local Indian Grocer. But he is always upping the ante.  For me, I like a simple traditional hummus.  Its simplicity is what makes it good, and I feel like why mess with a good thing? But there are times when you HAVE to change it up.  Like the time I was out of tahini.  Or like the two months I decided to give up all cooking oils.

This recipe does it all.  It is sesame free and oil free.  The creaminess of this recipe comes from the aquafaba.  What is aquafaba you ask?  It is the water that you normally drain from the can of beans, and it’s amazing!  We vegans use it all the time as a sub for eggs in vegan baking. The starchy liquid is a great binder directly from the can, but what really makes it magical is that it whips and creates foam. Aquafaba is therefore able to trap air; giving items structure at the same time it delivers a fluffy crumb and lift.  You can even make meringues!  In hummus, it adds a flavor and a creaminess that can’t be beat!  It’s the perfect sub for both the oil and the tahini!

Feel free to add whatever spices, or beans you want!  That’s the beauty of hummus, it can be as simple as whatever you have on hand, or as complex as you want it to be!   You can use it as a dip for veggies, or thin it out with a little bit of water and use as a dressing.  We love it on top of our Buddha bowls!

This is a keeper.

  • 2 15 ounce can chickpeas (garbanzo beans, drained but save aquafaba)
  • 2 cloves roasted garlic (buy it pre-roasted at Fresh Thyme)
  • ¼ cup aquafaba from chickpeas
  • 2 tbsp lemon juice (freshly squeezed is best)
  • 2 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tsp of ground coriander
  • ½ tsp of crushed red pepper
  • 1 tbsp parsley (dried)
  • 1 ½ tsp of salt
  • ½ tsp pepper (or to taste)

Mix all ingredients in blender, and blend until smooth. Add more aquafaba if you find that it’s too dry. Season to taste. Chill for a few hours, taste again, and adjust seasonings if necessary.  You can use olive oil in place of the aquafaba, but it won’t be as creamy, and you’ll save yourself about 240 calories!

Vegan Lobster Bisque

There are some things that a girl can’t live without.  I have decided that one of them is this recipe.  I love all things bisque, chowder and seafood.  However, since seafood isn’t on the table anymore, (all puns intended)…I had some work to do.  This is the result of that work. And I have to say, this recipe has truly been a labor of love.

There are some options for the Kelp Powder since it’s not likely in your pantry.  You can use pulse Nori Seaweed Sheets in food processor or blender (you can find them everywhere, even Wal-Mart), Dulse flakes (at most high end groceries, or amazon)  or you can also just buy kelp powder.  Kelp can add a powerful nutrient boost to smoothies, and it also goes well mixed in salad dressings, or sprinkled on top of vegetables.

Cosmopolitan magazine even loves Sea Kelp!  “Sea kelp is a natural source of vitamins A, B1, B2, C, D and E, as well as minerals including zinc, iodine, magnesium, iron, potassium, copper and calcium. In fact, it contains the highest natural concentration of calcium of any food – 10 times more than milk.”

If you try it, leave me a comment below!

VEGAN LOBSTER BISQUE

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  • 1 cup raw cashews (soaked overnight, or boiled for 10 minutes)
  • 1 cup vegetable broth
  • 1 tablespoon kelp powder
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch
  • 2 cups of onion, minced
  • 2 medium carrots, diced
  • 4 large celery ribs, diced
  • 4 medium garlic cloves, crushed
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 5 cups vegetable broth
  • 1 cup dry white wine
  • 2 cups dried Lobster mushrooms (soaked and diced)
  • 1 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • 1 teaspoon thyme
  • Pinch of cayenne
  • 1 bay leaf
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 3 sprigs flat-leaf parsley, plus minced leaves and tender stems for garnish
  1. Soak cashews overnight, or boil for 10 minutes. Add to blender with 1 cup of vegetable broth, kelp powder, and cornstarch. Blend until smooth, this will take a few minutes. Set aside. Soak the Lobster mushrooms, according to package directions.  (Reserve ¼ cup of the rehydrated mushrooms for garnish).
  2. Add olive oil to a large stockpot, and heat on medium. Add onion, garlic, celery, and carrots to the pot and cook for about 3 or 4 minutes, until softened.
  3. Stir tomato paste into vegetables and cook for 2 minutes. Add white wine and deglaze the pan. Simmer for 2 minutes. Add broth, cashew cream mixture, and seasonings. Bring to a simmer, reduce to low heat and cook for about 10 minutes.
  4. Remove bay leaf. Purée the soup with an immersion blender, or purée in batches in a blender until smooth, returning soup to the pot. Add diced mushrooms and simmer for 3-5 minutes until mushrooms are thoroughly heated through.
  5. Add salt & pepper to taste. Garnish and serve immediately.

 

 

 

Best Ever Vegan Ranch Dressing

When I began my plant-based journey, one of the first things I needed to find was a good Ranch Dressing.  I know, I know… But I’d be lying if I denied my love for Hidden Valley!  However, consuming pus laden cow’s milk is gross. And artificial ingredients like Calcium Disodium EDTA, and other nasty fake things like maltodextrin, and monosodium glutamate are not even an option.   I had tried many recipes, but was never fully satisfied. So I finally decided to create my own.  This Ranch is delicious and has impressed even my most diehard dairy loving peeps!

 

RANCH

 

  • 1 cup vegan mayo (I like Just Mayo)
  • 2 Tbsp Apple Cider Vinegar (I use Bragg’s with the mother-shaken well)
  • 1 Tbsp Dried Parsley
  • 1 Tbsp Dried Dill
  • 1 tsp Black Pepper
  • ½ tsp Salt
  • ½ tsp Onion Powder
  • ½ tsp Garlic Powder

Mix all ingredients together and use enough water to thin to desired consistency.  Let sit in the fridge for a few hours so the flavors can develop.  Keep refrigerated for up to 3 weeks.

To lengthen thy life, lessen thy meals-Benjamin Franklin

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“In 2016 Yoshinori Ohsumi, won the Nobel Prize in “Physiology or Medicine” for his discoveries around something called autophagy, a fundamental process for degrading and recycling cellular components.”(1)

The word autophagy originates from the Greek words auto-, meaning “self”, and phagein, meaning “to eat”. Thus, autophagy denotes “self eating”. Autophagy is the body’s internal recycling program – scrap cell components are captured and the useful parts are stripped out to generate energy or build new cells. The process is crucial for preventing cancerous growths, warding off infection and, by maintaining a healthy metabolism, it helps protect against conditions like diabetes.

One of the best ways to induce autophagy is through an “Intermittent Fast, or IF.” It takes a lot of energy to digest food and certain foods more than others. Our digestion rate is based on several things like basal metabolic rate and what we’ve eaten. But in general meat and fish can take as long as two days to fully digest. The proteins and fats that meat contain are complex molecules that take longer for your body to pull apart. By contrast, fruits and vegetables, which are high in fiber, move through your system in less than a day. In fact, these high-fiber foods help your digestive track run more efficiently in general.

The breaking down of all food (among other things) creates oxidation and free radicals in the body. Free radicals are toxic byproducts of oxygen metabolism that can cause significant damage to living cells and tissues in a process called “oxidative stress.” The vitamins and minerals the body uses to counteract oxidative stress are called antioxidants.

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According to Functional Medicine Dr. Stephen Cabral, the benefits of intermittent fasting are as follows:

  1. Weight loss. We are talking about a natural weight loss, where your body actually taps into body fat to lose weight.
  2. Lowered blood sugar levels. Lowered blood sugar decreases insulin, which in turns helps to decrease things like cortisol, estrogen, etc. Also decreases midsection fat.
  3. Speeds up metabolism. Who doesn’t want a faster metabolism?
  4. Promotes longevity (10-20% longer life). By allowing for processes of natural detoxification, and reduction of inflammation to occur.
  5. Better control hunger signals (Hunger vs. Cravings). An empty “stomach,” is true hunger (4-5 hours after last meal). A craving is usually a blood sugar issue.
  6. Improves detoxification because the body is now a scavenger for free radical’s and allows time for the liver to cleanse the blood.
  7. Improves brain energy/clarity because extra energy goes to your brain instead of your stomach. Shown to improve conditions like Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease.
  8. Improves your overall immune system by killing existing cancer cells, necrotic tissues, and cancer cells just starting out. It kills sick cells, microbes, and also helps prevent premature cell death.
  9. Lowers blood pressure, cholesterol, and inflammation, because you do not have as many free radicals in your body. Most all diseases are related to inflammation in the body.
  10. Helps clear up skin based issues like acne, psoriasis, and eczema that are caused by dirty blood, yeast overgrowth, and bacteria.

So how do you do an intermittent fast?

I prefer a once a week 24-hour fast, and here’s why. A simple 24-hour fast lasts from dinner-to-dinner, or breakfast-to-breakfast, whatever you like. For example, I eat a light dinner around 6 pm on Sunday evening and then I fast until the next day’s dinner at 6 pm. In this regimen, I do not actually go a full day without eating since I am still taking one meal on that ‘fasting’ day.   I have a plain, “Daily All-in-One Support Shake” for breakfast and another for lunch. I also drink at least 8 glasses of water and several cups of green tea throughout the day to help my body “feel full” and push all of the toxic waste out of my system. I begin every day (and have for years) with a smoothie for breakfast. So every day from dinner to lunch I am doing an 18-hour fast.

If a 24-hour or 18-hour fast is too much, then a simple 12-hour fast can be a great way to start. Essentially, you stop eating after dinner and do not eat again until breakfast the next morning, making sure there is at least 12 hours between meals.   This simple 12-hour fast can help regulate blood sugar, burn fat, and improve mental clarity.

 

 

The Ties that Bind

“My friend and I were passing some elephants, when my friend suddenly stopped. She was confused as to how these massive creatures were held only by a small rope tied to their front leg. No chains, no cages. It was obvious that the elephants could, at anytime, break away from their bonds, but for some reason, they did not. She saw a trainer nearby and asked why these animals just stood there and made no attempt to get away. “Well,” the trainer said, “when they are very young and much smaller, we use the same size rope to tie them and, at that age, it’s enough to hold them. As they grow up, they are conditioned to believe they cannot break away. They believe the rope can still hold them, so they never try to break free.” The man was amazed. These animals could at any time break free from their bonds, but because they believed they couldn’t, they were stuck right where they were.” –The Elephant and the Rope

As a health coach I often find many of my clients are “held back” by self-limiting beliefs. They either cling to beliefs that no longer serve them, or they still adhere to falsehoods they learned in childhood.   For example, while exploring why a severely obese client of mine over eats, he revealed that as a child, he was expected to eat everything on his plate even after he was full.  As he got older, and serving sizes got larger he continued to eat until his plate was empty.   By the way, did you know the average restaurant meal is now more than four times larger than it was in 1950’s?

So, are you like the elephant?  Were you told to keep eating even after you were full?  Have you tried every diet in the world and still can’t lose weight? Maybe it’s time to dig deeper and find out what’s really holding you back.  What ways do you feel bound and powerless?  The great thing about our belief system is that we can change it. And change it immediately.  Like the mighty elephant, you hold the power, even if you don’t realize it. It’s time to break the rope and finally be free.

 

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Chocolate Cream Pie (Vegan, GF)

I have a love/hate relationship with the word vegan.  On one hand, it encompasses many fundamental aspects of who I am.  Legitimate scientific concerns about my health and the systematic destruction of our planet, topped with my love and compassion for ALL of God’s creatures, far outweigh any desire I might have for a Delmonico Ribeye.  But, on the other hand the word vegan strikes fear into the hearts of most people. And its presumed connotations immediately separate me from the flock. For many, vegans are seen as extremists. Fanatics, who are either angry animal right suffragists, or gaunt, pale hippies who live on scant amounts of lettuce and tofu.  Just Google the phrase, “Vegans are…” and see what comes next. Adjectives like crazy, stupid, weird, and extreme, popped up in my search bar.  But ya know what?  I’m kinda getting over it.

When an “Omni'” eats a meal I’ve prepared, they are intrigued. Almost beguiled by my ability to make not only a palatable, but delectable meal without using any part of an animal.   It’s as if they’ve suddenly realized eating meat and cheese isn’t the only way to be truly satiated.   And one of my favorite ways to showcase my vegan culinary prowess is with this Chocolate Cream Pie.

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CRUST:

• 2 cups raw pecans
• 1/4 cup date sugar or maple sugar (I used coconut sugar and 1 tbsp maple syrup)
• 1 1/2 tbsp coconut oil (melted)
• 1/2 tsp sea salt
• 1/4 tsp chipotle powder (optional, but highly recommended)

FILLING:

• 2 1/2 cups vegan dark chocolate chips (add half semi-sweet vegan to make pie sweeter)
• 2 packs of organic firm silken tofu  (I like Mori-Nu Organic firm)
• 1 tsp vanilla extract
• Pinch of sea salt

Preheat the oven to 350°F

To prepare the crust, combine the pecans and sugar in a food processor fitted with the metal blade. Process until the mixture resembles a fine meal. Add the coconut oil, salt and optional chipotle powder and pulse to combine well.
Transfer the mixture to an 8- or 9-inch pie pan (I use an 8″ springform pan). Press and shape the mixture into the bottom and sides of the pan to make a pie shell.

Place the chocolate chips in a baking tray or shallow pan, Transfer to the preheated oven and heat for 3 to 4 minutes or just until melted. Watch carefully as the chocolate can burn quickly. Remove from the oven.

While the chocolate is melting, combine the tofu, vanilla and salt in a food processor fitted with the metal blade. Add the melted chocolate and blend until very smooth.

*Note: For the tofu, if you cannot find firm silken tofu, “soft” tofu can be used instead. In this case, use 600 grams total.

Pour the mixture into the reserved pie shell, smooth the top with an offset spatula and refrigerate for at least 20 minutes or until firm. When firm, slice and serve.

*Modified from Original Recipe via Rouxbe Cooking School.

 

Banana Chocolate Chip Muffins (Vegan, GF)

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This is an absolute favorite in our house.  The problem is we can’t keep them in our house.  When I take them hot out of the oven they’re gone before they’ve even cooled.  They’re that good!  I’ve modified the original recipe to make it gluten free.  Gluten free cooking often requires slight modifications, including cooking time.   I have also made a few substitutions that I felt made this recipe perfect for me!   I hope you enjoy them as much as we do! 

What You Need: (Makes 16 regular or 8-9 large muffins)

  • 2 cups gluten free all purpose flour (I use Bob’s Red Mill GF All Purpose flour)
  • 1 1/2 tsp of baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 cup brown sugar (makes them moist and less dense)
  • 1/3 cup coconut oil
  • 4 super ripe bananas
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 cup dairy free vegan chocolate chips (I use Enjoy Life)

 

Instructions:

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Lightly grease your muffin tins or use muffin liners.

In a bowl, mix the flour, baking soda and salt.

In a separate bowl, mix the sugar and the oil.  Add the mashed banana to the sugar mixture, then add chocolate chips, and vanilla.

Finally, add the flour, and mix everything well.

Evenly pour the batter into the muffin tins. Place in the oven for about 18-20 minutes if using GF flour.  If using regular all-purpose flour, test at 20 minutes.  Add more time (three minutes at a time) as needed.

***Cool for at least 5 minutes before you remove from the pan!